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The Jewish resistance : uprisings against the Nazis in World War II / Paul Roland.

By: Roland, Paul [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: London : Arcturus Publishing Limited, 2018Description: 191 pages : illustrations ; 20 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 178828397X; 9781788283977.Subject(s): Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945) | World War (1939-1945) | World War, 1939-1945 -- Jewish resistance | World War, 1939-1945 -- Participation, Jewish | Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945) | Military participation -- Jewish | 1939-1945DDC classification: 940.5/31832
Contents:
Introduction : The myth -- A question of faith -- In the lion's den -- Resisting the invaders -- Revolt in the east -- The Warsaw uprising -- Ghettos in flames -- Revolt!.
Summary: Before the uprising in the Warsaw ghetto, Jewish tailors sabotaged a consignment of German military uniforms by sewing the trouser legs together and stitching the buttons on backwards, despite knowing that the repercussions would be terrible. Seemingly futile acts like this were considered preferable to doing nothing. If they were to die, they would die with dignity as human beings, not as sub-humans as their would-be Aryan masters had classified them. The extent of Jewish resistance in World War II demonstrated that whatever you do to people, you can never crush the human spirit or the desire to live with dignity and survive the direst situations.
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Includes bibliographical references (pages 183-185) and index.

Introduction : The myth -- A question of faith -- In the lion's den -- Resisting the invaders -- Revolt in the east -- The Warsaw uprising -- Ghettos in flames -- Revolt!.

Before the uprising in the Warsaw ghetto, Jewish tailors sabotaged a consignment of German military uniforms by sewing the trouser legs together and stitching the buttons on backwards, despite knowing that the repercussions would be terrible. Seemingly futile acts like this were considered preferable to doing nothing. If they were to die, they would die with dignity as human beings, not as sub-humans as their would-be Aryan masters had classified them. The extent of Jewish resistance in World War II demonstrated that whatever you do to people, you can never crush the human spirit or the desire to live with dignity and survive the direst situations.