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A thin slice of heaven / Paul Wah.

By: Wah, Paul, 1932-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: [Lower Hutt, New Zealand] : Paul Wah, [2018]Copyright date: ©2018Description: 367 pages ; 21 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780473412463; 0473412462.Subject(s): Ng, Leung Kee -- Fiction | Emigration and immigration -- Fiction | Kidnapping -- Fiction | Guangdong Sheng (China) -- Politics and government -- Fiction | Guangdong Sheng (China) -- Social conditions -- Fiction | Wellington (N.Z.) -- FictionGenre/Form: New Zealand fiction -- 21st century. | Historical fiction. | Biographical fiction.DDC classification: NZ823.3 Summary: A historical novel recounting the adventures of the author's great-grandfather, Ng Leung Kee, who migrated to New Zealand in 1880 and set up a successful Chinese merchant business in Wellington. Ng Leung Kee returned to Tiansum, China in 1922, to take his grandson Leslie to receive a Chinese education. They faced significant challenges, including the kidnapping of Leslie by bandits, during a period of tumultuous political, economic and social conditions in China.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

A historical novel recounting the adventures of the author's great-grandfather, Ng Leung Kee, who migrated to New Zealand in 1880 and set up a successful Chinese merchant business in Wellington. Ng Leung Kee returned to Tiansum, China in 1922, to take his grandson Leslie to receive a Chinese education. They faced significant challenges, including the kidnapping of Leslie by bandits, during a period of tumultuous political, economic and social conditions in China.

Novel.

A historical novel recounting the adventures of the author's great-grandfather, Ng Leung Kee, who migrated to New Zealand in 1880 and set up a successful Chinese merchant business in Wellington. Ng Leung Kee returned to Tiansum, China in 1922, to take his grandson Leslie to receive a Chinese education. They faced significant challenges, including the kidnapping of Leslie by bandits, during a period of tumultuous political, economic and social conditions in China.