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And did those feet-- / Ted Dawe.

By: Dawe, Ted.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Dunedin, N.Z. : Longacre Press, 2006Description: 192 pages ; 20 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781877361494 (pbk.) :; 1877361496 (pbk.).Subject(s): New Zealand stories -- Juvenile fiction | Life change events -- Juvenile fiction | Floods -- Juvenile fiction | Farm life -- Juvenile fiction | Farm life -- New Zealand -- Juvenile fiction | Young adult fiction -- Juvenile fiction | Self-perception -- Juvenile fiction | Coming of age -- Juvenile fiction | Children's stories, New Zealand -- Juvenile fiction | Young adult fiction, New Zealand -- Juvenile fiction | Farm life -- Young adult fiction | Floods -- Young adult fiction | Life change events -- Young adult fiction | New Zealand -- Juvenile fiction | Taranaki (N.Z.) -- Juvenile fictionGenre/Form: Young adult fiction, New Zealand. | Children's stories, New Zealand. | New Zealand fiction. | Children's fiction.DDC classification: NZ823.3 Awards: New Zealand Post Book Awards for Children & Young Adults 2007 Finalist.Summary: The year Mum died and Dad went mad, a young man is sent to live on a farm with Aunt Lorna, Uncle Frank, and five cousins who belong to the Jerusalem League, a William Blake cult. Feeling lonely and depressed, he makes friends with Pimpernickle, the resident pig. While on a school camp a flood hits and everyone is forced to head to higher ground. How will they cross the river and reach safe ground? Just what happens when they're rescued? Suggested level: primary, intermediate.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due
Teenage Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Teenage Fiction
Teenage Fiction DAW 2 Available

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

'The year mum died and Dad went mad I was packed off to a farm for a while.' The first sentence of Ted Dawe's new book sets the scene for this tender and dramatic story. But this is no ordinary farm: our narrator's Aunt Lorna, Uncle Frank and five cousins belong to the Jerusalem League, a William Blake cult. Their house is unusual, in that the rooms are hexagons u six-sided u as are the doors and windows, the dinner table and plates. And you guessed it; they're bee-keepers. Our young narrator takes us through his initiation to farm life: chores and more chores, which he doesn't mind really, starting a new school and coping with the local bully, Noel Cudby, finding the perfect place: a swimming hole hidden in the bush, and making friends with Pimpernickle, the resident pig. It's here with Pimpernickle when we become aware of his loneliness: 'That pig is sure smart. I reckon he can tell my moods. When I'm feeling depressed, which is quite often to tell the truth, he comes over and stands next to me real close.' But when our storyteller goes off to school camp things turn from wet to wetter.Noah's flood is served up with a good serving of wind: the river rises and floods and the sorry lot of wet kids and a few parents are forced to head for higher ground. How will they cross the river and reach safe ground? Just what happens when they're rescued? A tender story told with humour and insight.

Novel for children.

The year Mum died and Dad went mad, a young man is sent to live on a farm with Aunt Lorna, Uncle Frank, and five cousins who belong to the Jerusalem League, a William Blake cult. Feeling lonely and depressed, he makes friends with Pimpernickle, the resident pig. While on a school camp a flood hits and everyone is forced to head to higher ground. How will they cross the river and reach safe ground? Just what happens when they're rescued? Suggested level: primary, intermediate.

New Zealand Post Book Awards for Children & Young Adults 2007 Finalist.

Suitable 13 years and upwards

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