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What hell is not / Alessandro D'Avenia ; translated by Jeremy Parzen.

By: D'Avenia, Alessandro, 1977-.
Contributor(s): Parzen, Jeremy [translator.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: London, England : Oneworld, 2019Description: 356 pages ; 22 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781786072757; 1786072750.Subject(s): Mafia -- Italy -- Palermo -- Fiction | Youth -- Societies and clubs -- Fiction | Murder -- Fiction | Teenage boys -- Fiction | Palermo (Italy) -- FictionGenre/Form: Detective and mystery fiction.DDC classification: 853.92 Summary: Federico is a privileged teenager from Palermo. He is preparing to spend a summer learning English in Oxford when his teacher, Father Pino, asks him to help out at a youth centre in an area of Palermo dominated by mafia and misery. To his parents' dismay, Federico decides to follow Father Pino into the darkness of Palermo's alleyways. Far removed from his familiar surroundings, Federico begins to learn from the incredibly tough lives of the children who attend the youth centre, and also from Lucia, a beautiful girl full of courage and light. Then one day, Father Pino is murdered by the mafia, and the hope for Palermo and its beauty are entrusted to Federico's young hands.
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Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Fiction Collection
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

The school year is finished, exams are over and summer stretches before seventeen-year-old Federico, full of promise and opportunity. But then he accepts a request from one of his teachers to help out at a youth club in the destitute Sicilian neighbourhood of Brancaccio. This narrow tangle of alleyways is controlled by local mafia thugs, but it is also the home of children like Francesco, Maria, Dario, Totò: children with none of Federico's privileges, but with a strength and vitality that changes his life forever.

Written in intensely passionate and lyrical prose, What Hell Is Not is the phenomenal Italian bestseller about a man who brought light to one of the darkest corners of Sicily, and who refused to give up on the future of its children.

Translated from the Italian.

Federico is a privileged teenager from Palermo. He is preparing to spend a summer learning English in Oxford when his teacher, Father Pino, asks him to help out at a youth centre in an area of Palermo dominated by mafia and misery. To his parents' dismay, Federico decides to follow Father Pino into the darkness of Palermo's alleyways. Far removed from his familiar surroundings, Federico begins to learn from the incredibly tough lives of the children who attend the youth centre, and also from Lucia, a beautiful girl full of courage and light. Then one day, Father Pino is murdered by the mafia, and the hope for Palermo and its beauty are entrusted to Federico's young hands.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Booklist Review

Seventeen-year-old Federico is set to leave his well-to-do Palermo family to go to Oxford to learn English when the beloved priest Don Pino asks him for help with the children of the hellish ghetto of Brancaccio. Federico reluctantly agrees, and, though his initial efforts are fruitless, he perseveres and then meets Lucia, with whom he falls in love. Captivated, he cancels his trip and becomes devoted to Don Pino's cause, to the children of Brancaccio, and, of course, to Lucia. Don Pino's plans to improve the ghetto are ambitious enough to capture the attention of the Mafia, which, concerned that the plans might compromise its control, assaults both the priest and Federico. Will the boy abandon Don Pino, and will the priest abandon his plans? Originally published in Italy and issued here in translation, What Hell Is Not is an examination of the admixture of heaven and hell, of love and hate. Rich in figurative language, which is sometimes heavy-handed, the story is, nevertheless, equally rich in characterization and setting. Hell, it turns out, is losing your freedom to love.--Michael Cart Copyright 2018 Booklist