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Smart mothering : what science says about caring for your baby and yourself / Dr Natalie Flynn.

By: Flynn, Natalie.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Auckland, N.Z. : Allen & Unwin, 2019Copyright date: ©2019Description: 528 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 1988547083; 9781988547084.Subject(s): Newborn infants -- Care | Infants -- Care | Motherhood | Mother and infantSummary: 'Natalie has a wealth of knowledge on so many topics and provides great bite-sized pieces of advice.' Dr Natalie Flynn has examined all the research on key baby topics such as feeding, sleeping and crying. The result? Smart Mothering, a revolutionary book that separates the facts from the opinions.Find out what research says about the dilemmas so many parents face: What if I can't breastfeed? Is it best to feed on demand? Can I leave my baby to cry? Should I vaccinate my baby? Is bed-sharing a good idea? Natalie provides the answers to these questions and many more.Smart Mothering is objective, accessible and practical. With helpful tips, succinct summaries and clear diagrams it demystifies the often confusing and overwhelming world of parenting.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due
Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Non-Fiction
Non-Fiction 649.122 FLY Available
Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Parenting Collection
Parenting Collection 649.122 FLY Available

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

'This is the one book every new parent actually needs.' Nigel Latta

Includes bibliographical references and index.

'Natalie has a wealth of knowledge on so many topics and provides great bite-sized pieces of advice.' Dr Natalie Flynn has examined all the research on key baby topics such as feeding, sleeping and crying. The result? Smart Mothering, a revolutionary book that separates the facts from the opinions.Find out what research says about the dilemmas so many parents face: What if I can't breastfeed? Is it best to feed on demand? Can I leave my baby to cry? Should I vaccinate my baby? Is bed-sharing a good idea? Natalie provides the answers to these questions and many more.Smart Mothering is objective, accessible and practical. With helpful tips, succinct summaries and clear diagrams it demystifies the often confusing and overwhelming world of parenting.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Introduction (p. 10)
  • Part I The Modern Parenting Climate (p. 13)
  • Chapter 1 Bombardment stress: Sorting fact from fiction (p. 14)
  • Battling the BS (p. 18)
  • The road to BS-free parenting (p. 24)
  • Chapter 2 The changing face of the parenting relationship (p. 26)
  • Parent knows best vs baby knows best (p. 27)
  • The rise of extreme parenting (p. 29)
  • Putting Bowlby's attachment theory to the test (p. 41)
  • Building a positive relationship (p. 50)
  • Your own emotional health: the other half of the equation (p. 72)
  • To routine or not to routine? (p. 76)
  • Part II Looking After Yourself (p. 85)
  • Chapter 3 Happiness and well-being (p. 86)
  • Happiness and well-being (p. 87)
  • Circuitries for happiness (p. 88)
  • Notice the positive (p. 95)
  • Practise self-compassion (p. 97)
  • Chapter 4 Tuning in and keeping calm (p. 101)
  • The four parts of an emotion (p. 102)
  • Skills for tuning in (p. 106)
  • Tuning in to your emotions (p. 109)
  • Diffusion (p. 113)
  • Space Therapy (p. 116)
  • Chapter 5 Reflecting on your birth experience (p. 125)
  • Birth trauma (p. 127)
  • Childbirth-related Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) (p. 128)
  • Guilt (p. 130)
  • Chapter 6 Baby blues and beyond (p. 142)
  • The baby blues (p. 143)
  • Perinatal mental health (p. 147)
  • Perinatal depression and anxiety (p. 148)
  • Out-of-control emotions (p. 163)
  • Perinatal Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) (p. 165)
  • Bipolar disorder (p. 169)
  • Perinatal psychosis (p. 172)
  • Chapter 7 Relationships and sex (p. 174)
  • From a couple to parents (p. 176)
  • Intimacy and sex (p. 182)
  • Chapter 8 Motherhood and identity (p. 187)
  • Who am I? (p. 190)
  • Expanding your identity (p. 191)
  • Part III Looking After Your Baby (p. 195)
  • Chapter 9 Crying (p. 196)
  • When your baby won't stop crying: the first three months (p. 197)
  • Colic (p. 210)
  • Colic and Karp's 'calming reflex' (p. 218)
  • Sometimes babies just cry (p. 220)
  • Soothing the soother (p. 222)
  • A primer on cortisol (p. 228)
  • Moving from soothing towards a sleep routine (p. 233)
  • Chapter 10 Sleeping (p. 238)
  • When your baby won't sleep: three months and beyond (p. 240)
  • Sleep-training? It's your choice (p. 245)
  • Safe sleep (p. 252)
  • Chapter 11 Breastfeeding: Nice, but never necessary (p. 272)
  • What the research says (p. 273)
  • Mothers have their say (p. 277)
  • The rise of the 'breast is best' movement (p. 291)
  • The imperfect breast (p. 301)
  • Fear-mongering about formula (p. 309)
  • Scrutinising the 'benefits' (p. 311)
  • A closer look at other breastfeeding claims (p. 318)
  • Chapter 12 The right way to feed-breast or bottle (p. 334)
  • Getting the terminology right (p. 335)
  • It's the time that counts (p. 338)
  • Sensitive and responsive feeding: the how-tos (p. 340)
  • Common feeding questions (p. 344)
  • Chapter 13 Breastfeeding: A practical guide (p. 349)
  • Getting started (p. 350)
  • The low-down on breast milk (p. 352)
  • The three stages of breastfeeding (p. 353)
  • Getting a good latch (p. 355)
  • Breastfeeding positions (p. 358)
  • Troubleshooting (p. 366)
  • Fed is best (p. 371)
  • Chapter 14 Bottle-feeding and formula: A practical guide (p. 373)
  • It's not the why that matters (p. 374)
  • The low-down on formula (p. 378)
  • Keep it sterile (p. 380)
  • How to make up a bottle of formula (p. 382)
  • Paced bottle-feeding (p. 384)
  • Chapter 15 Immunisation (p. 388)
  • A brief history of immunisation (p. 389)
  • Herd immunity (p. 392)
  • How safe are vaccines? (p. 394)
  • Delay is a risk (p. 396)
  • The autism lie (p. 397)
  • Chapter 16 Technology and the developing brain (p. 405)
  • Parents as role models (p. 406)
  • The official paediatric position (p. 410)
  • Screen time and cognitive function (p. 412)
  • Screen time and psychological well-being (p. 414)
  • Addiction (p. 415)
  • Can we put the genie back in the bottle? (p. 418)
  • Chapter 17 Nannies, daycare and working mothers (p. 420)
  • The impact of daycare (p. 423)
  • Childcare in baby's first year (p. 425)
  • Childcare after baby's first year (p. 430)
  • Childcare and cortisol (p. 435)
  • It's a balancing act (p. 438)
  • Appendices (p. 441)
  • Appendix I Diarrheal diseases and breastfeeding (p. 442)
  • Appendix II Respiratory illnesses and breastfeeding (p. 445)
  • Appendix III Urinary tract diseases and breastfeeding (p. 449)
  • Appendix IV Type 1 diabetes and breastfeeding (p. 452)
  • Appendix V Atopic conditions and breastfeeding (p. 455)
  • Asthma: Does breastfeeding help? (p. 457)
  • Eczema: Does breastfeeding help? (p. 459)
  • Hay fever: Does breastfeeding help? (p. 460)
  • Appendix VI Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and breastfeeding (p. 461)
  • Appendix VII Obesity and breastfeeding (p. 470)
  • Appendix VIII Antisocial behaviour and breastfeeding (p. 474)
  • Appendix IX Intelligence and breastfeeding (p. 478)
  • Notes (p. 491)
  • Index (p. 524)