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Lange: Migrant Mother. Sarah Hermanson Meister.

By: Hermanson Meister, Sarah.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: 1 on one: Publisher: New York : Museum of Modern Art 2018Description: 48 p.ISBN: 9781633450660; 163345066X.DDC classification: 770 Summary: The US was in the midst of the Depression when Dorothea Lange (1895?1965) began documenting its impact through depictions of unemployed men on the streets of San Francisco. Her success won the attention of Roosevelt's Resettlement Administration (later the Farm Security Administration), and in 1935 she started photographing the rural poor under its auspices. One day in Nipomo, California, Lange recalled, she "saw and approached [a] hungry and desperate mother, as if drawn by a magnet." The woman's name was Florence Owens Thompson, and the result of their encounter was seven exposures, including "Migrant Mother." Curator Sarah Meister's essay provides a fresh context for this iconic work.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

The United States was in the midst of the Depression when photographer Dorothea Lange, a portrait-studio owner, began documenting the country's rampant poverty. Her depictions of unemployed men wandering the streets of San Francisco gained the attention of one of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal agencies, the Resettlement Administration (later the Farm Security Administration), and she started photographing the rural poor under its auspices. Her images triggered a pivotal public recognition of the lives of sharecroppers, displaced families, and migrant workers. One day in Nipomo, California, Lange recalled, she 'saw and approached [a] hungry and desperate mother, as if drawn by a magnet.' The woman's name was Frances Owens Thompson, and the result of their encounter was five exposures, including Migrant Mother , which would become an iconic piece of documentary photography.

The US was in the midst of the Depression when Dorothea Lange (1895?1965) began documenting its impact through depictions of unemployed men on the streets of San Francisco. Her success won the attention of Roosevelt's Resettlement Administration (later the Farm Security Administration), and in 1935 she started photographing the rural poor under its auspices. One day in Nipomo, California, Lange recalled, she "saw and approached [a] hungry and desperate mother, as if drawn by a magnet." The woman's name was Florence Owens Thompson, and the result of their encounter was seven exposures, including "Migrant Mother." Curator Sarah Meister's essay provides a fresh context for this iconic work.