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The book of forgiving : the fourfold path for healing ourselves and our world / Desmond Tutu and Mpho A. Tutu ; edited by Douglas C. Abrams.

By: Tutu, Desmond.
Contributor(s): Abrams, Douglas Carlton [editor.] | Tutu, Mpho A [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York, New York : HarperOne, 2015Copyright date: ©2014Edition: FIRST edition.Description: 229 pages ; 22 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780062203564; 0062203568; 9780062203571; 0062203576.Subject(s): Forgiveness | Forgiveness -- Religious aspects -- ChristianityGenre/Form: Nonfiction.DDC classification: 179/.9 Summary: "Nobel laureate Archbishop Desmond Tutu has witnessed some of the worst crimes people can inflict on others. So wherever he goes, he inevitably gets asked this question: How do I forgive? This book is his answer. Writing with his daughter, Mpho, an Anglican priest, they lay out the simple but profound truths about the significance of forgiveness, how it works, why everyone needs to know how to grant it and receive it, and why granting forgiveness is the greatest gift we can give to ourselves when we have been wronged. They explain the four-step process of forgiveness -- Telling the Story, Naming the Hurt, Granting Forgiveness, and Renewing or Releasing the Relationship -- as well as offer meditations, exercises, and prayers to guide the reader along the way. 'With each act of forgiveness, whether small or great, we move toward wholeness, ' they write. 'Forgiveness is how we bring peace to ourselves and our world.'"-- Provided by publisher.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Nobel Peace Prize winner, Chair of The Elders, and Chair of South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission, along with his daughter, the Reverend Mpho Tutu, offer a manual on the art of forgiveness--helping us to realize that we are all capable of healing and transformation.

Tutu's role as the Chair of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission taught him much about forgiveness. If you asked anyone what they thought was going to happen to South Africa after apartheid, almost universally it was predicted that the country would be devastated by a comprehensive bloodbath. Yet, instead of revenge and retribution, this new nation chose to tread the difficult path of confession, forgiveness, and reconciliation.

Each of us has a deep need to forgive and to be forgiven. After much reflection on the process of forgiveness, Tutu has seen that there are four important steps to healing: Admitting the wrong and acknowledging the harm; Telling one's story and witnessing the anguish; Asking for forgiveness and granting forgiveness; and renewing or releasing the relationship. Forgiveness is hard work. Sometimes it even feels like an impossible task. But it is only through walking this fourfold path that Tutu says we can free ourselves of the endless and unyielding cycle of pain and retribution. The Book of Forgiving is both a touchstone and a tool, offering Tutu's wise advice and showing the way to experience forgiveness. Ultimately, forgiving is the only means we have to heal ourselves and our aching world.

Includes bibliographical references.

"Nobel laureate Archbishop Desmond Tutu has witnessed some of the worst crimes people can inflict on others. So wherever he goes, he inevitably gets asked this question: How do I forgive? This book is his answer. Writing with his daughter, Mpho, an Anglican priest, they lay out the simple but profound truths about the significance of forgiveness, how it works, why everyone needs to know how to grant it and receive it, and why granting forgiveness is the greatest gift we can give to ourselves when we have been wronged. They explain the four-step process of forgiveness -- Telling the Story, Naming the Hurt, Granting Forgiveness, and Renewing or Releasing the Relationship -- as well as offer meditations, exercises, and prayers to guide the reader along the way. 'With each act of forgiveness, whether small or great, we move toward wholeness, ' they write. 'Forgiveness is how we bring peace to ourselves and our world.'"-- Provided by publisher.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Introduction: Into Wholeness (p. 1)
  • Part 1 Understanding Forgiveness
  • 1 Why Forgive? (p. 15)
  • 2 What Forgiveness Is Not (p. 31)
  • 3 Understanding the Fourfold Path (p. 45)
  • Part 2 The Fourfold Path
  • 4 Telling the Story (p. 61)
  • 5 Naming the Hurt (p. 93)
  • 6 Granting Forgiveness (p. 119)
  • 7 Renewing or Releasing the Relationship (p. 145)
  • Part 3 All can be Forgiven
  • 8 Needing Forgiveness (p. 165)
  • 9 Forgiving Yourself (p. 195)
  • 10 A World of Forgiveness (p. 215)
  • Resources (p. 226)
  • Acknowledgments (p. 227)
  • Notes (p. 230)

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

No one, perhaps, now stands in higher esteem in the world as a spiritual leader than Tutu, 1984 Nobel Peace Prize winner, chair of South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission, and a former archbishop. This book, his second collaboration with his daughter Mpho, follows on from his previous accounts of his life and his work with the commission but amounts to a guide to practical sainthood and a how-to on forgiveness. Forgiveness ought to be simple but is all but impossible for most, even in small things; the Tutus's recipe restores its simplicity. VERDICT Desmond Tutu's moral authority alone makes his books worth reading; this volume more than repays that trust with its deep wisdom. Churches and businesses will benefit from this-and so should -governments. (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Publishers Weekly Review

Though ostensibly retired from public life, Nobel Peace Prize-winner and emeritus archbishop Desmond Tutu still has much to say. His newest book on forgiveness in some ways extends and applies the lessons of his pathbreaking No Future Without Forgiveness (1999). Both books draw on his experience heading South Africa's post-apartheid Truth and Reconciliation Commission, but this is freshly informed with experiences that include smaller slights and insults as well as more traumatic wrongs, among them the murder of the housekeeper of Mpho Tutu, daughter of Desmond Tutu. The father-daughter pair relate stories but also include instructions on how to forgive, as well as scientific and moral reasons to do so. No one is unforgiveable; it takes a moral icon such as Tutu to credibly assert this. The book may get a boost from the recent death of Nelson Mandela, about whom Tutu says, "It took 27 years for him to be transformed from an angry, unforgiving young radical into an icon of reconciliation." This book belongs on nightstands, shelves, and altars everywhere. Agent: Lynn Franklin, Lynn C. Franklin Associates. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Kirkus Book Review

A practical call for forgiveness from people who learned it the hard way. Nobel Peace Prize recipient and Anglican archbishop Tutu (God Is Not a Christian: And Other Provocations, 2011, etc.) teams up with his daughter, Mpho, also an Anglican priest, to advance the cause of forgiveness. Their work stems from a shared past steeped in South Africa's apartheid system. Mpho's experience is also informed by a personal tragedy: the murder of her family's housekeeper. For both authors, forgiveness has been a lifelong struggle, yet one which they both embrace and endorse. "There is nothing that cannot be forgiven, and there is no one undeserving of forgiveness," they write. Indeed, one of the authors' important points is that all people feel pain, and no one hurts another without having been a victim at some earlier point. They acknowledge that forgiveness is not easy; however, they are convinced that forgiveness offers peace, healing and an opening to a productive future. They guide readers through a "Fourfold Path" of forgiveness: telling the story, naming the hurt, granting forgiveness, and renewing or releasing the relationship. They also provide focus for individuals in need of another's forgiveness and those who need to forgive themselves. The book is almost entirely practical in focus, geared toward helping people come to grips with issues of anger, grief and loss. It includes meditations, rituals and journal exercises after each chapter. While potentially useful, the text is lightweight in relation to some of the examples of superhuman forgiveness punctuating the workvictims of grave crimes pardoning those who have caused such anguish. There is a disconnect between the gravitas of the surname Tutu in relationship to what is basically a self-help book. Tutu's No Future Without Forgiveness (1999) is a far weightier and more worthy discussion of the topic.]] Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.