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The squatters : the story of Australia's pastoral pioneers / Barry Stone.

By: Stone, Barry.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Sydney, New South Wales : Allen & Unwin, 2019Copyright date: ©2019Description: vii, 245 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.Content type: text | still image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781760291532; 1760291536.Subject(s): Squatters -- Australia -- History | Europeans -- Australia -- History | Australia -- History -- 1788-1900DDC classification: 994.02 Summary: For the early settlers who came from Britain's crowded cities and tiny villages, it must have been extraordinarily liberating to pack their belongings onto a bullock dray and head beyond the reach of meddlesome authorities to claim new land for themselves. Settlers spread out across inland Australia constructing windmills and fences, dry-stone walls and storehouses, livestock yards and droving routes, the traces of which can still be seen today. The fortunate and indomitable succeeded, while countless others succumbed to drought and flood. Those who were successful became a class all their own: the scrub aristocrats. Barry Stone has scoured through diaries, journals and newspapers, and sorted myth from legend. He tells the stories of pioneers whose vision and hard work built pastoral empires running thousands of head of stock, providing meat for a growing colony and wool for export, a rural juggernaut that would lay the foundations of a prosperous nation.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due
Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Non-Fiction (NEST)
Non-Fiction (NEST) 994.02 STO Checked out 22/07/2019

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

For the early settlers who came from crowded cities and long established villages, it must have been extraordinary to find you could pack your belongings onto a bullock dray and head off to rural grasslands out of the reach of meddlesome authorities. They could just mark out a parcel of land, bring in sheep or cattle, and build a future.

Some made their fortunes, others failed through drought, poor land, or bad management. Those who succeeded built vast pastoral empires running tens of thousands of head of stock, providing meat for the voracious growing colony and wool for export to England. These squatters became a bush aristocracy, with all the trappings. Families dined in gilded dining rooms with black servants waiting on them, dance halls were built in small communities, and grazing families intermarried to maintain control of property. Some even had their own artillery batteries, in case the workers revolted.

These were the "kings in grass castles" and it was a time of big dreams. Barry Stone tells stories of the men and women fanned across Australia across the 19th century and created a rural establishment that contributed more than any other segment of society to the growth of a prosperous nation.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

For the early settlers who came from Britain's crowded cities and tiny villages, it must have been extraordinarily liberating to pack their belongings onto a bullock dray and head beyond the reach of meddlesome authorities to claim new land for themselves. Settlers spread out across inland Australia constructing windmills and fences, dry-stone walls and storehouses, livestock yards and droving routes, the traces of which can still be seen today. The fortunate and indomitable succeeded, while countless others succumbed to drought and flood. Those who were successful became a class all their own: the scrub aristocrats. Barry Stone has scoured through diaries, journals and newspapers, and sorted myth from legend. He tells the stories of pioneers whose vision and hard work built pastoral empires running thousands of head of stock, providing meat for a growing colony and wool for export, a rural juggernaut that would lay the foundations of a prosperous nation.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Introduction (p. 1)
  • 1 The limits of location (p. 9)
  • 2 Ever westward (p. 29)
  • 3 The wasteland of the Crown (p. 59)
  • 4 'More English than England' (p. 91)
  • 5 'The finest park land I ever saw ...' (p. 121)
  • 6 Shepherd kings of the Darling Downs (p. 149)
  • 7 'Kings in Grass Castles': Settling the Top End (p. 177)
  • 8 Australia Felix (p. 203)
  • Notes (p. 221)
  • Bibliography (p. 231)
  • Index (p. 241)