Whanganuilibrary.com
Normal view MARC view ISBD view

The laws of human nature / Robert Greene.

By: Greene, Robert.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: London, England : Profile Books Ltd, 2018Copyright date: ©2018Description: 609 pages ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 1781259194; 9781781259191; 9781788161558; 1788161556.Subject(s): Self-actualization (Psychology) | Self-control | Motivation (Psychology) | Success | Interpersonal relations | Philosophical anthropologyDDC classification: 158 Summary: "We are social animals. Our very lives depend on our relationships with people. Knowing why people do what they do is the most important tool we can possess, without which our other talents can only take us so far. Drawing from the ideas and examples of Pericles, Queen Elizabeth I, Martin Luther King Jr, and many others, Greene teaches us how to detach ourselves from our own emotions and master self-control, how to develop the empathy that leads to insight, how to look behind people's masks, and how to resist conformity to develop your singular sense of purpose. Whether at work, in relationships, or in shaping the world around you, The Laws of Human Nature offers tactics for success, self-improvement, and self-defence."-- Publisher description.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due
Non-Fiction Hakeke Street Library
Non-Fiction (NEST)
Non-Fiction (NEST) 158 GRE Available

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

From the #1 New York Times -bestselling author of The 48 Laws of Power comes the definitive new book on decoding the behaviour of the people around you.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

"We are social animals. Our very lives depend on our relationships with people. Knowing why people do what they do is the most important tool we can possess, without which our other talents can only take us so far. Drawing from the ideas and examples of Pericles, Queen Elizabeth I, Martin Luther King Jr, and many others, Greene teaches us how to detach ourselves from our own emotions and master self-control, how to develop the empathy that leads to insight, how to look behind people's masks, and how to resist conformity to develop your singular sense of purpose. Whether at work, in relationships, or in shaping the world around you, The Laws of Human Nature offers tactics for success, self-improvement, and self-defence."-- Publisher description.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Greene (Mastery; The 48 Laws of Power) draws from the wisdom of ancient philosophers, respected psychologists, and eminent writers to provide insight into all aspects of human behavior and their root causes. These qualities are organized into "laws," including the law of compulsive behavior, the law of self-sabotage, and the law of grandiosity. Greene defines, interprets, and suggests ways to deal with each trait, concluding that through possessing the knowledge of these concepts we can stand apart from draining emotional drama, be better judges of character, outthink toxic types, rid ourselves of negative patterns, and enjoy more satisfyingbonds. VERDICT While hefty in size, this readable and relevant tome should have wide appeal. © Copyright 2018. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Publishers Weekly Review

In this detailed and expansive guide, Greene (Mastery) seeks to immerse his audience in "all aspects of human behavior," as represented by 18 laws created by Greene. He claims that studying these laws will transform the reader into a "calmer and more strategic observer," immune to "emotional drama." Those are lofty promises, but even skeptics will become believers after diving into Greene's well-organized text. In each chapter, he describes the benefits of confronting and overcoming a different form of human fallibility. Overcoming the "law of irrationality," for instance, leads to the ability to "open your mind to what is really happening, as opposed to what you are feeling." For historical perspective, he highlights relevant famous figures: Howard Hughes represents the pitfalls of compulsive behavior, and Anton Chekhov embodies the benefits of overcoming self-sabotage. Greene also quotes a number of literary greats along the way, including Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Friedrich Nietzsche, and Gore Vidal, whose aphorism "Every time a friend succeeds, I die a little" is applied, not surprisingly, to the chapter on envy. Throughout, Greene's overriding message is to "step back" from the "immediate rush of events" in order to gain greater insight into one's experiences and circumstances. Greene's thoughtful examination of self and society will, for the committed reader, deliver a refreshing and revitalizing perspective. Agent: Michael Carlisle, InkWell Management. (Oct.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Kirkus Book Review

A follow-on to the author's garbled but popular 48 Laws of Power, promising that readers will learn how to win friends and influence people, to say nothing of outfoxing all those "toxic types" out in the world.Greene (Mastery, 2012, etc.) begins with a big sell, averring that his book "is designed to immerse you in all aspects of human behavior and illuminate its root causes." To gauge by this fat compendium, human behavior is mostly rotten, a presumption that fits with the author's neo-Machiavellian program of self-validation and eventual strategic supremacy. The author works to formula: First, state a "law," such as "confront your dark side" or "know your limits," the latter of which seems pale compared to the Delphic oracle's "nothing in excess." Next, elaborate on that law with what might seem to be as plain as day: "Losing contact with reality, we make irrational decisions. That is why our success often does not last." One imagines there might be other reasons for the evanescence of glory, but there you go. Finally, spin out a long tutelary yarn, seemingly the longer the better, to shore up the truismin this case, the cometary rise and fall of one-time Disney CEO Michael Eisner, with the warning, "his fate could easily be yours, albeit most likely on a smaller scale," which ranks right up there with the fortuneteller's "I sense that someone you know has died" in orders of probability. It's enough to inspire a new law: Beware of those who spend too much time telling you what you already know, even when it's dressed up in fresh-sounding terms. "Continually mix the visceral with the analytic" is the language of a consultant's report, more important-sounding than "go with your gut but use your head, too."The Stoics did much better with the much shorter Enchiridion. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.