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The lady in the cellar : murder, scandal and insanity in Victorian Bloomsbury / Sinclair McKay.

By: McKay, Sinclair.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: London, England : White Lion Publishing, 2018Description: 311 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 25 cm.Content type: text | still image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781781317983; 1781317984.Subject(s): Murder -- England -- London -- History -- 19th century | Bloomsbury (London, England) -- History -- 19th centuryGenre/Form: True crime stories.DDC classification: 364.152/309421 Summary: Standing four stories tall in an elegant Bloomsbury terrace, number 4, Euston Square was a well-kept, respectable boarding house, whose tenants felt themselves to be on the rise in Victorian London. But beneath this genteel veneer lay a murderous darkness. For on 9th May 1879, the body of a former resident, Matilda Hacker, was discovered by chance in the coal cellar. The ensuing investigation stripped bare the dark side of Victorian domesticity, revealing violence, sex and scandal, and became the first celebrity case of the early tabloids. Someone must have had full knowledge of what had happened to Matilda Hacker. For someone in that house had killed her. So how could the murderer prove so elusive?
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due
Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Non-Fiction (NEST)
Non-Fiction (NEST) 364.1523 MCK Checked out 05/08/2019

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

'Gripping, gothic and deeply poignant' Mail on Sunday

Standing four storeys tall in an elegant Bloomsbury terrace, number 4, Euston Square was a well-kept, respectable boarding house, whose tenants felt themselves to be on the rise in Victorian London. But beneath this genteel veneer lay a murderous darkness. For on 9th May 1879, the body of a former
resident, Matilda Hacker, was discovered by chance in the coal cellar. The ensuing investigation stripped bare the dark side of Victorian domesticity, revealing violence, sex and scandal, and became the first celebrity case of the early tabloids.

Someone must have had full knowledge of what had happened to Matilda Hacker. For someone in that house had killed her. So how could the murderer prove so elusive?

In this true story, Sinclair McKay meticulously evaluates the evidence and, through first-hand sources, giving a gripping account that sheds new light on a mystery that eluded Scotland Yard.

Includes bibliographical references.

Standing four stories tall in an elegant Bloomsbury terrace, number 4, Euston Square was a well-kept, respectable boarding house, whose tenants felt themselves to be on the rise in Victorian London. But beneath this genteel veneer lay a murderous darkness. For on 9th May 1879, the body of a former resident, Matilda Hacker, was discovered by chance in the coal cellar. The ensuing investigation stripped bare the dark side of Victorian domesticity, revealing violence, sex and scandal, and became the first celebrity case of the early tabloids. Someone must have had full knowledge of what had happened to Matilda Hacker. For someone in that house had killed her. So how could the murderer prove so elusive?

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Preface - The Dislocation of the Dead (p. 1)
  • 1 The Day Before (p. 7)
  • 2 'There Is Something in the Cellar' (p. 15)
  • 3 The Man from X Division (p. 25)
  • 4 A City of Disappearances (p. 31)
  • 5 'I Am Not a judge of Human Bones' (p. 35)
  • 6 Superior Apartments in a Quiet Home (p. 49)
  • 7 'A Mass of Light-Coloured Ringlets' (p. 55)
  • 8 The Canterbury Dolls (p. 61)
  • 9 The Book of Dreams (p. 71)
  • 10 'No, Not Me' (p. 77)
  • 11 The Brothers Bastendorff (p. 97)
  • 12 The New Age of Light (p. 105)
  • 13 He Kept Company with Her (p. 111)
  • 14 The Boiling Bones (p. 123)
  • 15 'Everything Was Sweet' (p. 131)
  • 16 'It Was Not My Place' (p. 141)
  • 17 'Working Women Like Herself' (p. 163)
  • 18 Avowed Admirers (p. 171)
  • 19 'The Expected Child' (p. 177)
  • 20 'Oh God! What a Sight Met My Gaze!' (p. 197)
  • 21 She Had No Character (p. 215)
  • 22 'I Have Disgraced You Before all the Country' (p. 223)
  • 23 'I Depend Upon My Character' (p. 231)
  • 24 'Such a Strange Brotherly Part' (p. 249)
  • 25 Disintegration (p. 259)
  • 26 A Length of Washing Line (p. 279)
  • 27 The Stain That Would Not Go (p. 291)
  • Notes (p. 297)
  • Picture Credits (p. 301)
  • Afterword: A Bloomsbury and Somers Town Walk (p. 302)
  • Afterword Two: Illustrated Murder and Mayhem! - The Victorian Press (p. 304)
  • Selected Further Reading (p. 307)
  • Acknowledgements (p. 311)