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The Queen's embroiderer : a true story of Paris, lovers, swindlers, and the first stock market crisis / Joan DeJean.

By: DeJean, Joan E.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York, New York : Bloomsbury Publishing, 2018Copyright date: ©2018Description: vii, 375 pages : illustrations (some colour), maps ; 25 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781632864741; 1632864746; 9781632864758; 1632864754.Other title: Queens embroiderer.Subject(s): Financial crises -- France -- History | France -- History -- Bourbons, 1589-1789 | Versailles (France) -- HistoryDDC classification: 944/.030922 Summary: Paris, 1719. The stock market is surging and the world's first millionaires are buying everything in sight. Against this backdrop, two families, the Magoulets and the Chevrots, rose to prominence only to plummet in the first stock market crash. One family built its name on the burgeoning financial industry, the other as master embroiderers for Queen Marie-Th?r?se and her husband, King Louis XIV. Both patriarchs were ruthless money-mongers, determined to strike it rich by arranging marriages for their children. But in a Shakespearean twist, two of their children fell in love. To remain together, Louise Magoulet and Louis Chevrot fought their fathers' rage and abuse. A real-life heroine, Louise took on Magoulet, Chevrot, the police, an army regiment, and the French Indies Company to stay with the man she loved. Following these families from 1600 until the Revolution of 1789, Joan DeJean recreates the larger-than-life personalities of Versailles, where displaying wealth was a power game; the sordid cells of the Bastille; the Louisiana territory, where Frenchwomen were forcibly sent to marry colonists; and the legendary "Wall Street of Paris," Rue Quincampoix, a world of high finance uncannily similar to what we know now. The Queen's Embroiderer is both a story of star-crossed love in the most beautiful city in the world and a cautionary tale of greed and the dangerous lure of windfall profits. And every bit of it is true.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

From the author of How Paris Became Paris , a sweeping history of high finance, the origins of high fashion, and a pair of star-crossed lovers in 18th-century France.

Paris, 1719. The stock market is surging and the world's first millionaires are buying everything in sight. Against this backdrop, two families, the Magoulets and the Chevrots, rose to prominence only to plummet in the first stock market crash. One family built its name on the burgeoning financial industry, the other as master embroiderers for Queen Marie-Thérèse and her husband, King Louis XIV. Both patriarchs were ruthless money-mongers, determined to strike it rich by arranging marriagesfor their children.

But in a Shakespearean twist, two of their children fell in love. To remain together, Louise Magoulet and Louis Chevrot fought their fathers' rage and abuse. A real-life heroine, Louise took on Magoulet, Chevrot, the police, an army regiment, and the French Indies Company to stay with the man she loved.

Following these families from 1600 until the Revolution of 1789, Joan DeJean recreates the larger-than-life personalities of Versailles, where displaying wealth was a power game; the sordid cells of the Bastille; the Louisiana territory, where Frenchwomen were forcibly sent to marry colonists; and the legendary "Wall Street of Paris," Rue Quincampoix, a world of high finance uncannily similar to what we know now. The Queen's Embroiderer is both a story of star-crossed love in the most beautiful city in the world and a cautionary tale of greed and the dangerous lure of windfall profits. And every bit of it is true.

Includes bibliographical references (page [347]-354 and index.

Paris, 1719. The stock market is surging and the world's first millionaires are buying everything in sight. Against this backdrop, two families, the Magoulets and the Chevrots, rose to prominence only to plummet in the first stock market crash. One family built its name on the burgeoning financial industry, the other as master embroiderers for Queen Marie-Th?r?se and her husband, King Louis XIV. Both patriarchs were ruthless money-mongers, determined to strike it rich by arranging marriages for their children. But in a Shakespearean twist, two of their children fell in love. To remain together, Louise Magoulet and Louis Chevrot fought their fathers' rage and abuse. A real-life heroine, Louise took on Magoulet, Chevrot, the police, an army regiment, and the French Indies Company to stay with the man she loved. Following these families from 1600 until the Revolution of 1789, Joan DeJean recreates the larger-than-life personalities of Versailles, where displaying wealth was a power game; the sordid cells of the Bastille; the Louisiana territory, where Frenchwomen were forcibly sent to marry colonists; and the legendary "Wall Street of Paris," Rue Quincampoix, a world of high finance uncannily similar to what we know now. The Queen's Embroiderer is both a story of star-crossed love in the most beautiful city in the world and a cautionary tale of greed and the dangerous lure of windfall profits. And every bit of it is true.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Magoulet Family Tree (p. viii)
  • Map of Paris in the Early 18th Century (p. x)
  • Timeline (p. xiii)
  • How This Began (p. xv)
  • Chapter 1 The Queen's Embroiderers (p. 1)
  • Chapter 2 Star-Crossed (p. 10)
  • Chapter 3 Upward Mobility 1: Salt and Taxes The Chevrots: 1604-1698 (p. 20)
  • Chapter 4 Upward Mobility 2: Purveyors to the Crown The Magoulets; 1638-1678 (p. 36)
  • Chapter 5 Salad Days The Magoulets: 1679-1698 (p. 52)
  • Chapter 6 Annual Income, Annual Expenditure The Magoulets: 1677-1691 (p. 61)
  • Chapter 7 Secrets and Lies The Magoulets: 1692-1704 (p. 78)
  • Chapter 8 A Person of Consequence The Chevrots: 1692-1708 (p. 96)
  • Chapter 9 The Great Winter The Chevrots: 1708-1716 (p. 106)
  • Chapter 10 The Deadly Years The Magoulets: 1706-1718 (p. 118)
  • Chapter 11 The Gold Rush (p. 136)
  • Chapter 12 The Invention of Money (p. 145)
  • Chapter 13 Personation (p. 166)
  • Chapter 14 "The Incredible Madness of the 20th Year of the Eighteenth Century" (p. 179)
  • Chapter 15 Aftershocks Everyone: 1721-1723 (p. 195)
  • Chapter 16 Total Eclipse Everyone: 1323-1324 (p. 210)
  • Chapter 17 "A Diabolical Person" (p. 228)
  • Chapter 18 The Remains of the Day The Chevrots: 1725-1736 (p. 239)
  • Chapter 19 The Prince's Embroiderer, The Prince's Designer The Magoulets: 1728-1761 (p. 254)
  • Chapter 20 The King's Prosecutors (p. 276)
  • Aftermath (p. 283)
  • Chapter 21 To the Islands (p. 285)
  • Chapter 22 A Royal Wedding The Magoulets: 1717-1790 (p. 292)
  • Chapter 23 The Noise of Time The Chevrots: 1736-1790 (p. 301)
  • Afterword A Father's Love (p. 316)
  • Coda The Bourbons (p. 318)
  • Acknowledgments (p. 321)
  • Appendix: Price Index (p. 325)
  • Notes (p. 327)
  • Archival Documents Consulted (p. 337)
  • Bibliography (p. 347)
  • Illustration Credits (p. 355)
  • Index (p. 359)

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Booklist Review

In this twisted tale of two French families, DeJean (How Paris Became Paris, 2014) interweaves the rise and fall of the Magoulets and the Chevrots, who took divergent paths to wealth, power, and ignominy. Initially master embroiderers in service to Louis XIV, the Magoulets eventually worked and married their way into a powerful economic position in eighteenth-century France. Their counterparts, the Chevrots, took a less traditional route, investing heavily in the newfangled stock market. Though the fortunes of both families burst in the first stock market crisis, it is the story of star-crossed lovers Louise Magoulet and Louis Chevrot that takes center stage. Fighting their families, who view marriage as only a means to increasing status and fortune, they (especially Louise) suffer extremely tragic fates in their quest to be together. Though the narrative often gets bogged down in economic minutiae, the fascinating details of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Parisian fashion, politics, and feuds will reward persevering readers.--Flanagan, Margaret Copyright 2018 Booklist

Kirkus Book Review

The tale of two 17th- and 18th-century French families, a story that begins as a fairy tale and ends as a nightmare.The families Magoulet and Chevrot tied their stars to the court of Louis XIV. The Magoulets were master embroiderers who also made leather cases to transport fragile treasures. The king's wars, winter, famine, and poor economics eventually curtailed their work and livelihood, but Jacques Magoulet caught the eye of Louis' finance minister and became the tax collector for the nation. One of DeJean's (Romance Languages/Univ. of Pennsylvania; How Paris Became Paris: The Invention of the Modern City, 2014, etc.) main narrative elements involves men who knew no rules. They wanted to be rich and noble, and lying and cheating become their primary methods. The Chevrots, however, took another approach. They chose to make money from money, eschewing conspicuous consumption and devoting all their energy to purchasing positions from the crown to advance their standing. The fastest way to amass money was to marry into it, and the Chevrots played the game well--except for the Romeo and Juliet of their families, who fell in love and vowed to marry. Louis appointed John Law, an Englishman, to control the largest economy in Europe, and he introduced paper money, dividends, the first ever investment fever, and, finally, the bursting bubble. Unfortunately, most of the book concerns economics, which is not the author's forte, and the title is misleading. Money controlled the drive of these two families, and many of them were liars, forgers, imposters, and abusers. The narrative is intermittently interesting but difficult to follow as the stories jump around in time and between families. Times were difficult, but these two families drove themselves to ruin by pure, unadulterated greed.Of interest for students of French history or the history of finance, if they can tie it all together.