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The communist manifesto [graphic novel] / by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels ; adapted by Martin Rowson.

By: Rowson, Martin [author,, illustrator.].
Contributor(s): Engels, Friedrich, 1820-1895 [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: London : SelfMadeHero, 2018Copyright date: �2018Description: 1 volume (unpaged) : chiefly color illustrations ; 27 cm.Content type: still image | text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781910593493; 1910593494.Related works: Graphic novelization of (work): Marx, Karl, 1818-1883. Manifest der Kommunistischen Partei.Subject(s): Marx, Karl, 1818-1883. Manifest der Kommunistischen Partei -- Adaptations -- Comic books, strips, etc | Manifest der Kommunistischen Partei (Marx, Karl) | Communism -- Comic books, strips, etc | Socialism -- Comic books, strips, etc | Communism | SocialismGenre/Form: Graphic novels. | Nonfiction comics. | Comic books, strips, etc. | Graphic novels. | Nonfiction comics.DDC classification: 741.5 Summary: "A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of Communism . Published in 1848, at a time of political upheaval in Europe, Karl Marx and Frederik Engels' Manifesto for the Communist Party was at once a powerful critique of capitalism and a radical call to arms. It remains the most incisive introduction to the ideas of Communism and the most lucid explanation of its aims. Much of what Marx and Engels' proposed - a state education system, a progressive income tax, the nationalisation of banks - would continue to be at the heart of political debate into the 21st century. It is no surprise, perhaps, that The Communist Manifesto (as it was later renamed) is the second best-selling book of all time, surpassed only by The Bible.The Guardian's editorial cartoonist Martin Rowson employs his trademark draughtsmanship and wit to this lively graphic novel adaptation of Marx and Engels' revolutionary pamphlet."--Publisher's description.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Published in 1848, at a time of political upheaval in Europe, Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels's Manifesto for the Communist Party was at once a powerful critique of capitalism and a radical call to arms. It remains the most incisive introduction to the ideas of Communism and the most lucid explanation of its aims. Much of what it proposed continues to be at the heart of political debate into the 21st century. It is no surprise, perhaps, that The Communist Manifesto (as it was later renamed) is the second bestselling book of all time, surpassed only by the Bible.

The Guardian 's editorial cartoonist Martin Rowson employs his trademark draftsmanship and wit to this lively graphic novel adaptation. Published to coincide with the 200th anniversary of Marx's birth, The Communist Manifesto is both a timely reminder of the politics of hope and a thought-provoking guide to the most influential work of political theory ever published.

"Working men of all countries, unite! You have nothing to lose but your chains. You have a world to win."

"A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of Communism . Published in 1848, at a time of political upheaval in Europe, Karl Marx and Frederik Engels' Manifesto for the Communist Party was at once a powerful critique of capitalism and a radical call to arms. It remains the most incisive introduction to the ideas of Communism and the most lucid explanation of its aims. Much of what Marx and Engels' proposed - a state education system, a progressive income tax, the nationalisation of banks - would continue to be at the heart of political debate into the 21st century. It is no surprise, perhaps, that The Communist Manifesto (as it was later renamed) is the second best-selling book of all time, surpassed only by The Bible.The Guardian's editorial cartoonist Martin Rowson employs his trademark draughtsmanship and wit to this lively graphic novel adaptation of Marx and Engels' revolutionary pamphlet."--Publisher's description.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Released in time for German philosopher Marx's 200th birthday, Rowson's (Tristram Shandy; The Wasteland) graphic novel adaptation of this classic revolutionary work, cowritten with theorist Engels, offers a visually powerful introduction to Marxist thought. Renowned for his scathing political satire, Rowson presents passages from the Manifesto as a series of monologs by Marx himself, depicting each of the book's four sections in different visual scenarios. For example, descriptions of the bourgeoisie are underscored by scenes of apocalyptic violence as a gigantic top-hatted robot personifying capitalism chews up hundreds of people; as a nightclub comedian, Marx responds to anticipated criticisms of communism before an audience of ghoulish capitalists; and the authors' typology of socialism is presented as a narrative-free montage of statues. The startling illustrations-exhaustively rendered crosshatching that recalls Hieronymus Bosch-complements the original text and merits dedicated attention from readers to appreciate fully its brutal details. Verdict An excellent overview of Marxism, a brilliant critique of capitalism, and a fine example of political cartooning that will be of interest to high school and university audiences. Highly recommended.-Michael Dudley, Univ. of Winnipeg Lib., Man. © Copyright 2018. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Publishers Weekly Review

Rowson (The Wasteland), a political cartoonist whose scabrous style can be traced right back to Ralph Steadman, has produced a funny and nightmarishly dark graphic adaptation of communism's foundational document. Rowson reimagines the book as a kind of lecture, with the bearded authors-Marx with a cigar in his hand and a cynical smirk on his face, Engels holding a great red flag yet to be unfurled-strolling through a hellish landscape in which demonic steampunk machines grind up hapless proletarians into grist for the capitalist mill. At one point, Marx lectures in a "Kapitalist Komedy Club" open-mic night. Though the backdrops, with their Pink Floyd's The Wall aesthetic, can distract, this adaptation admirably boils down Marx's history lessons and luridly illustrates the warning that the bourgeoisie class produces "its own grave-diggers." While the book takes Marx's assumptions about the inevitability of a vast proletarian uprising at face value, it also includes a wry coda on the aftermath of Marx-inspired revolutions. The result is a jauntily irreverent but fundamentally serious take on a vastly influential political work. (May) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.