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Desert gardens of Steve Martino / Caren Iglesias ; photographs by Steve Gunther ; foreword by Obie G. Bowman.

By: Yglesias, Caren.
Contributor(s): Martino, Steve, 1946- [architect,, author.] | Gunther, Steve [photographer.] | Bowman, Obie G [writer of foreword.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York, New York : The Monacelli Press, [2018]Copyright date: ©2018Description: 235 pages : illustrations (some colour), colour plans ; 25 x 29 cm.Content type: text | still image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 1580934919; 9781580934916.Subject(s): Martino, Steve, 1946- | Desert landscape architecture -- United StatesGenre/Form: Illustrated works.DDC classification: 712 Summary: This survey of twenty-one gardens by Steve Martino, whose work blends colorful, man-made elements with native plants to reflect the sun-drenched beauty of the desert, is sure to inspire gardeners, landscapers, and admirers of California and the Southwest. For more than thirty years, Steve Martino has been committed to the development and advancement of landscape architecture in the Southwest. His pioneering work with native plant material and the development of a desert-derived design aesthetic is widely recognized. A recurring theme of his work is the dramatic juxtaposition of man-made elements with ecological processes of the region. His love for the desert--the interplay of light and shadow, the colors, plants, and wildlife--inspires his work.
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Non-Fiction Gonville Library
Non-Fiction
Non-Fiction 712.6 MAR In transit from Davis (Central) Library to Gonville Library since 16/02/2020

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

For more than thirty years, Steve Martino has been committed to the development and advancement of landscape architecture in the Southwest. His pioneering work with native plant material and the development of a desert-derived design aesthetic is widely recognized. A recurring theme of his work is the dramatic juxtaposition of man-made elements with ecological processes of the region. His love for the desert--the interplay of light and shadow, the colors, plants, and wildlife--inspires his work.

As Martino explains, "Gardens consist of two worlds, the man-made and the natural one. I've described my design style as 'Weeds and Walls'--nature and man. I use native plants to make the transition from a building to the adjacent natural desert."

Though Martino's work is deeply connected to the natural world, he also has a flair for the dramatic, which is apparent from his lively color selections, sculptural use of plants, and keen attention to lighting, shadows, and reflections. Boldly colored stucco walls frame compelling views of the desert and sky, expanding the outdoor living area while solving common site problems such as lack of privacy or shade. Interspersed are custom structures molded in translucent fiberglass in vivid hues--colorful arbors, outdoor showers, and internally lit benches.

Includes essay by Steve Martino.

This survey of twenty-one gardens by Steve Martino, whose work blends colorful, man-made elements with native plants to reflect the sun-drenched beauty of the desert, is sure to inspire gardeners, landscapers, and admirers of California and the Southwest. For more than thirty years, Steve Martino has been committed to the development and advancement of landscape architecture in the Southwest. His pioneering work with native plant material and the development of a desert-derived design aesthetic is widely recognized. A recurring theme of his work is the dramatic juxtaposition of man-made elements with ecological processes of the region. His love for the desert--the interplay of light and shadow, the colors, plants, and wildlife--inspires his work.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Landscape architect Steve Martino has been fascinated by the desert since a young age, when he would explore his Phoenix surroundings on horseback. Later, he majored in architecture and became more interested in outside spaces and how to use them as expansions of a building's interior. Interested in native desert plants at a time when other landscape architects considered them nothing but weeds, Martino describes his work as "weeds and walls," pairing native plants alongside boldly painted stucco walls, water features, and custom outdoor furnishings. Spectacular photographs by Gunther illustrate this volume showcasing 21 of Martino's artistic gardens in Arizona and California, which dramatically capture the light, colors, and shadows of the Southwest. Following an introductory chapter in which Martino discusses the evolution of his work, author Yglesias (landscape architecture & environmental planning, Univ. of California, Berkeley; The Innovative Use of Materials in Architecture and Landscape Architecture) describes each garden's development. VERDICT A beautifully made book that will appeal to gardeners and designers interested in the -Southwest.-Phillip Oliver, formerly with Univ. of North Alabama, Florence © Copyright 2018. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Steve Martino does for desert gardens what 18th-century horticulturist Capability Brown did for the English landscape garden. Just as Brown limited the trees used in his landscapes to those native to the British Isles, Martino uses only native plants in his gardens--typically plants found in the Arizona desert. This is in sharp contrast to the dry gardening, or xeriscaping, of California's Ruth Bancroft Garden, acclaimed for its rich cosmopolitan diversity. Martino's gardens pay homage instead to the walled gardens of North Africa and Spain. While the plants sip water, most gardens have at least one water feature, often a lavishly scaled swimming pool. Another characteristic is a brightly colored wall, often an intense blue. The garden type is aesthetically comfortable with minimalist modern and Spanish styled houses. Text is spare, excepting a foreword, preface, and a brief essay contributed by Martino himself, who continues to be quite active in the garden design world. Visually stunning, the photographs and garden plans are left essentially to speak for themselves. Clearly a book for landscape designers and those who dream of living in the ideal southwestern landscape. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students through faculty and professionals; general readers. --Irwin Richman, emeritus, Pennsylvania State University, Harrisburg Campus