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Japan Living : form and function at the cutting edge / Marcia Iwatate and Geeta K. Mehta ; photography by Nacása & Partners.

By: Iwatate, Marcia.
Contributor(s): Mehta, Geeta K [author.] | Nacása & Partners [photographer.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Rutland, Vermont : Tuttle Publishing, an imprint of Periplus Editions, [2015]Copyright date: ©2008Description: 256 pages ; 30 cm.Content type: text | still image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9784805313336; 4805313331.Subject(s): Architect-designed houses -- Japan | Architecture, Domestic -- Japan | Interior decoration -- JapanDDC classification: 728.3709 IWA 2015
Contents:
Design for a new generation -- Manazuru villa -- Mountain villa -- Atelier Semper -- Shimogamo Yakocho House -- Horizon House -- Kamiyamacho House -- Wing Villa -- WS Residence -- Kamitaga Residence -- Ring House -- Tsurumi Atelier + Residence -- K Courtyard House -- Izumiya -- Noborigama House -- Jogasaki Kaigan House -- Sheet Metal Teahouse -- Ocean villa -- Whole Earth Project -- House in the forest -- Yamate House -- Yatsugatake House -- S House -- Nigata House -- Four-In-One House -- Mejiro House -- Nakadai House -- F House -- Hover House -- AO House -- E House.
Summary: Natural serenity, understated refinement, clean lines and the balancing of light and space are all hallmarks of Japanese interior design. Some houses represented in "Japan Living" reflect the many changes in the dynamics of the new Japanese society, including an aging population and the desire to remain single, while others embody plenty of creativity, self-expression and individuality. Throughout, a return to traditional materials and design elements is married with such present-day requirements as minimalism, flexibility, energy efficiency and electronic gadgetry. Each of these homes is an exquisite representation of the integrity consistently found in Japanese interior design, in both new construction and old.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due
Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Non-Fiction (NEST)
Non-Fiction (NEST) 747.0952 IWA Checked out 09/01/2020

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Gain insight into both modern and Japanese styles with this stunning Japanese interior design book.

Japan Living presents thirty exceptional houses that transcend function and resonate with spirit. These new Japanese homes, chosen for their inspiring and innovative designs, are special places to dream in. The owners and architects, working as collaborative teams, have created homes that are quintessentially Japanese.

Crisp, sharp, transparent and light--these new designs represent a new burst of creativity over the past decade. Many reflect changes in the dynamics of Japanese society, while others represent self-expression and individuality. All of them are marked by a return to traditional Japanese materials and design elements married with such present-day requirements as flexibility, modern kitchens and bathrooms, energy efficiency and electronic gadgetry.

Design for a new generation -- Manazuru villa -- Mountain villa -- Atelier Semper -- Shimogamo Yakocho House -- Horizon House -- Kamiyamacho House -- Wing Villa -- WS Residence -- Kamitaga Residence -- Ring House -- Tsurumi Atelier + Residence -- K Courtyard House -- Izumiya -- Noborigama House -- Jogasaki Kaigan House -- Sheet Metal Teahouse -- Ocean villa -- Whole Earth Project -- House in the forest -- Yamate House -- Yatsugatake House -- S House -- Nigata House -- Four-In-One House -- Mejiro House -- Nakadai House -- F House -- Hover House -- AO House -- E House.

Natural serenity, understated refinement, clean lines and the balancing of light and space are all hallmarks of Japanese interior design. Some houses represented in "Japan Living" reflect the many changes in the dynamics of the new Japanese society, including an aging population and the desire to remain single, while others embody plenty of creativity, self-expression and individuality. Throughout, a return to traditional materials and design elements is married with such present-day requirements as minimalism, flexibility, energy efficiency and electronic gadgetry. Each of these homes is an exquisite representation of the integrity consistently found in Japanese interior design, in both new construction and old.