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Mrs Pankhurst's purple feather : fashion, fury and feminism - women's fight for change / Tessa Boase.

By: Boase, Tessa.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: London, England : Aurum Press, 2018Copyright date: ©2018Description: xvi, 320 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (some colour) ; 24 cm.Content type: text | still image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 1781316546; 9781781316542.Subject(s): Lemon, Margaretta, 1860-1953 | Pankhurst, Emmeline, 1858-1928 | Royal Society for the Protection of Birds -- History | Feminism -- Great Britain -- History -- 20th century | Millinery -- History -- 20th century | Women -- Suffrage -- Great Britain -- History | Women -- Political activity -- Great Britain -- History -- 20th century | Great Britain -- History -- Edward VII, 1901-1910 | Great Britain -- Social conditions -- 20th centuryDDC classification: 305.420941
Contents:
Prologue -- Feathers -- Birds -- Hats -- Votes -- Power -- Epilogue.
Summary: When Mrs Pankhurst stormed the House of Commons with her militant suffragettes in 1908, she wore on her hat a voluptuous purple feather. Twelve years earlier, a very different women's campaign captured the public imagination. Its aim was to stamp out the fashion for feathers in hats. Leading the fight was Etta Lemon. She was anti-fashion, anti-feminist– and anti-suffrage. Britain’s biggest conservation charity, the RSPB, was born through the determined efforts of a handful of women led by Mrs Lemon. Boase explores these rival, overlapping campaigns to show a society in transformation. -- adapted from jacket.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

'Shocking and entertaining. The surprising story of the campaigning women who changed Britain.' Virginia Nicholson

'Full of fascinating historical detail and colourful characters... A great story, beautifully told.' Kate Humble

When Mrs Pankhurst stormed the House of Commons with her crack squad of militant suffragettes in 1908, she wore on her hat a voluptuous purple feather. This is the intriguing story behind that feather.

Twelve years before the suffragette movement began dominating headlines, a very different women's campaign captured the public imagination. Its aim was radical: to stamp out the fashion for feathers in hats. Leading the fight was a character just as heroic as Emmeline Pankhurst, but with opposite beliefs. Her name was Etta Lemon, and she was anti-fashion, anti-feminist - and anti-suffrage.

Mrs Lemon has been forgotten by history, but her mighty society lives on. Few, today, are aware that Britain's biggest conservation charity, the RSPB, was born through the determined efforts of a handful of women, led by the indomitable Mrs Lemon. While the suffragettes were slashing paintings and smashing shop windows, Etta Lemon and her local secretaries were challenging 'murderous millinery' all the way up to Parliament.

This gripping narrative explores two singular heroines - one lionised, the other forgotten - and their rival, overlapping campaigns. Moving from the feather workers' slums to the highest courtly circles, from the first female political rally to the first forcible feeding, Mrs Pankhurst's Purple Feather is a unique journey through a society in transformation.

This is a highly original story of women stepping into the public sphere, agitating for change - and finally finding a voice.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 305-309) and index.

Prologue -- Feathers -- Birds -- Hats -- Votes -- Power -- Epilogue.

When Mrs Pankhurst stormed the House of Commons with her militant suffragettes in 1908, she wore on her hat a voluptuous purple feather. Twelve years earlier, a very different women's campaign captured the public imagination. Its aim was to stamp out the fashion for feathers in hats. Leading the fight was Etta Lemon. She was anti-fashion, anti-feminist– and anti-suffrage. Britain’s biggest conservation charity, the RSPB, was born through the determined efforts of a handful of women led by Mrs Lemon. Boase explores these rival, overlapping campaigns to show a society in transformation. -- adapted from jacket.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Leading Characters (p. vii)
  • Prologue (p. ix)
  • Part 1 Feathers (p. 1)
  • 1 Alice Battershall (p. 2)
  • 2 Inspector Lakeman (p. 8)
  • 3 97 Lever Street (p. 15)
  • 4 Women Undercover (p. 19)
  • 5 'Crewe Factory Girl' (p. 23)
  • 6 The Skylark (p. 26)
  • Part 2 Birds (p. 31)
  • 7 Young Etta (p. 32)
  • 8 Young Emmeline (p. 40)
  • 9 The Train Carriage (p. 43)
  • 10 Of Bird-Wearing Age (p. 47)
  • 11 The Tea Party (p. 53)
  • 12 Emily Williamson (p. 62)
  • 13 A Very Ambitious Title (p. 67)
  • 14 Flight (p. 72)
  • 15 Impracticable Dreamers (p. 76)
  • 16 Courting the Men (p. 82)
  • 17 Winifred, Duchess of Portland (p. 88)
  • 18 The Crème de la Crème (p. 97)
  • Part 3 Hat's (p. 105)
  • 19 Dying to Get Out (p. 106)
  • 20 The Millinery Detectives (p. 111)
  • 21 Queen Alix (p. 115)
  • 22 'Egret' Bennett (p. 121)
  • 23 Deeds Not Words (p. 128)
  • 24 The Frontal Attack (p. 132)
  • 25 Mrs Pattinson (p. 137)
  • 26 The Countess Fabbricotti (p. 142)
  • 27 Royal Approval (p. 150)
  • 28 The 'Suffragette' (p. 156)
  • Part 4 Votes (p. 161)
  • 29 Onto the Street (p. 162)
  • 30 The Antis (p. 174)
  • 31 The Feminine Arts (p. 186)
  • 32 The Advice of Men (p. 195)
  • 33 Maternal Weakness (p. 207)
  • 34 Peak Rage (p. 219)
  • 35 The Feeding Tube (p. 229)
  • 36 Dumb Creation (p. 235)
  • Part 5 Power (p. 241)
  • 37 At War (p. 242)
  • 38 The Ballot Box (p. 249)
  • 39 But What Do Women Care? (p. 256)
  • 40 Etta and Emmeline: Two Portraits (p. 263)
  • 41 The Coup (p. 272)
  • Epilogue (p. 283)
  • Notes (p. 290)
  • Select Bibliography (p. 305)
  • Acknowledgements (p. 310)
  • Index (p. 313)
  • Picture Credits (p. 320)