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Dancing with the King : the rise and fall of the King Country, 1864-1885 / Michael Belgrave.

By: Belgrave, Michael.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Auckland, New Zealand : Auckland University Press, 2017Copyright date: ©2017Description: viii, 428 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (some colour), maps, portraits ; 25 cm.Content type: text | still image | cartographic image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781869408695 (hardback); 1869408691 (hardback).Subject(s): Tāwhiao, King of the Māori, active 1860-1894 | Maori (New Zealand people) -- New Zealand -- King Country -- Government relations | Tainui (New Zealand people) -- Government relations | Aukati | Kīngitanga | Kōrero nehe | Kāwanatanga | Noho-ā-iwi | King Country (N.Z.) -- History -- 19th centuryDDC classification: 993.302
Contents:
Stalemate, 1864 -- Making the King country, 1864-1869 -- 'Kati -- Kati -- Kati me mutu': accommodation with violence, 1869-1873 -- The first steps: McLean and Tāwhiao, 1875-1876 -- Impasse: four Hui with Grey, 1878-1879 -- Resisting the court and courting the townfolk: Rewi and Tāwhiao, 1879-1882 -- Tāwhara Kai Atua: a bridge to nowhere -- 'In the place of the King': Bryce and the leaders of Rohe Pōtae -- The dance of the petitions -- Tāwhiao goes to London -- John Ballance: paternalist and land activist -- Finale: turning the sod.
Summary: After the battle of Orakau in 1864 and the end of the war in the Waikato, Tawhiao, the second Maori King, and his supporters were forced into an armed isolation in the Rohe Potae, the King Country. For the next twenty years, the King Country operated as an independent state - a land governed by the Maori King where settlers and the Crown entered at risk of their lives. Dancing with the King is the story of the King Country when it was the King's country, and of the negotiations between the King and the Queen that finally opened the area to European settlement. For twenty years, the King and the Queen's representatives engaged in a dance of diplomacy involving gamesmanship, conspiracy, pageantry and hard headed politics, with the occasional act of violence or threat of it. While the Crown refused to acknowledge the King's legitimacy, the colonial government and the settlers were forced to treat Tawhiao as a King, to negotiate with him as the ruler and representative of a sovereign state, and to accord him the respect and formality that this involved. Colonial negotiators even made Tawhiao offers of settlement that came very close to recognising his sovereign authority.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due
Te Taurawhiri Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Te Taurawhiri
Te Taurawhiri 993.3 BEL Checked out 15/08/2020

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

After the battle of Orakau in 1864 and the end of the war in the Waikato, Tawhiao, the second Maori King, and his supporters were forced into an armed isolation in the Rohe Potae, the King Country. For the next twenty years, the King Country operated as an independent state - a land governed by the Maori King where settlers and the Crown entered at risk of their lives.Dancing with the King is the story of the King Country when it was the King's country, and of the negotiations between the King and the Queen that finally opened the area to European settlement. For twenty years, the King and the Queen's representatives engaged in a dance of diplomacy involving gamesmanship, conspiracy, pageantry and hard headed politics, with the occasional act of violence or threat of it. While the Crown refused to acknowledge the King's legitimacy, the colonial government and the settlers were forced to treat Tawhiao as a King, to negotiate with him as the ruler and representative of a sovereign state, and to accord him the respect and formality that this involved. Colonial negotiators even made Tawhiao offers of settlement that came very close to recognising his sovereign authority.Dancing with the King is a riveting account of a key moment in New Zealand history as an extraordinary cast of characters - Tawhiao and Rewi Maniapoto, Donald McLean and George Grey - negotiated the role of the King and the Queen, of Maori and Pakeha, in New Zealand.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 405-411) and index.

Stalemate, 1864 -- Making the King country, 1864-1869 -- 'Kati -- Kati -- Kati me mutu': accommodation with violence, 1869-1873 -- The first steps: McLean and Tāwhiao, 1875-1876 -- Impasse: four Hui with Grey, 1878-1879 -- Resisting the court and courting the townfolk: Rewi and Tāwhiao, 1879-1882 -- Tāwhara Kai Atua: a bridge to nowhere -- 'In the place of the King': Bryce and the leaders of Rohe Pōtae -- The dance of the petitions -- Tāwhiao goes to London -- John Ballance: paternalist and land activist -- Finale: turning the sod.

After the battle of Orakau in 1864 and the end of the war in the Waikato, Tawhiao, the second Maori King, and his supporters were forced into an armed isolation in the Rohe Potae, the King Country. For the next twenty years, the King Country operated as an independent state - a land governed by the Maori King where settlers and the Crown entered at risk of their lives. Dancing with the King is the story of the King Country when it was the King's country, and of the negotiations between the King and the Queen that finally opened the area to European settlement. For twenty years, the King and the Queen's representatives engaged in a dance of diplomacy involving gamesmanship, conspiracy, pageantry and hard headed politics, with the occasional act of violence or threat of it. While the Crown refused to acknowledge the King's legitimacy, the colonial government and the settlers were forced to treat Tawhiao as a King, to negotiate with him as the ruler and representative of a sovereign state, and to accord him the respect and formality that this involved. Colonial negotiators even made Tawhiao offers of settlement that came very close to recognising his sovereign authority.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Acknowlegements (p. vii)
  • Chapter 1 Stalemate, 1864 (p. 1)
  • Chapter 2 Making the King Country, 1864-1869 (p. 12)
  • Chapter 3 'Kati - Kati - Kati me mutu': Accommodation with Violence, 1869-1873 (p. 43)
  • Chapter 4 The First Steps: McLean and Tawhiao, 1875-1876 (p. 77)
  • Chapter 5 Impasse: Four Hui with Grey, 1878-1879 (p. 91)
  • Chapter 6 Resisting the Court and Courting the Townsfolk: Rewi and Tawhiao, 1879-1882 (p. 157)
  • Chapter 7 Tawhara Kai Atua: A Bridge to Nowhere (p. 201)
  • Chapter 8 'In the place of the King': Bryce and the Leaders of the Rohe Potae (p. 222)
  • Chapter 9 The Dance of the Petitions (p. 267)
  • Chapter 10 Tawhiao goes to London (p. 294)
  • Chapter 11 John Ballance: Paternalist and Land Activist (p. 339)
  • Chapter 12 Finale: Turning the Sod (p. 364)
  • Notes (p. 375)
  • Bibliography (p. 405)
  • List of Maps (p. 412)
  • Index (p. 413)