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Strafbatallion : Hitler's penal battalions / Walter S. Zapotoczny, Jr.

By: Zapotoczny, Walter S., Jr.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: [United Kingdom] : Fonthill Media Limited, 2017Description: 224 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781781556474; 1781556474.Subject(s): Germany. Heer | Military discipline -- Germany -- History -- 20th century | World War, 1939-1945 -- Regimental histories -- Germany | Military offenses -- Germany -- History -- 20th century | Soldiers -- Germany -- History -- 20th century | World War, 1939-1945 -- CampaignsDDC classification: 940.54/1343 Summary: When war broke out in 1939, Hitler created `Strafbattalion' (Penal Battalion) units to deal with incarcerated members of the Wehrmacht as well as `subversives'. His order stated that any first-time convicted soldier could return to his unit after he had served a portion of his sentence in `a special probation corps before the enemy'. Beginning in April 1941, convicted soldiers-even those sentenced to death-who had shown exceptional bravery or meritorious service were allowed to rejoin their original units. However those in probation units were expected to undertake dangerous operations at the front. Refusal entailed enforcement of the original sentence. The soldiers who `win back an honourable place in the national community' had done everything that was asked of them: risky advance teams, spyware and shock troops, laying mines under enemy fire. This book examines the penal units, their combat history and order of battle.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due
Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Non-Fiction
Non-Fiction 940.5413 ZAP Checked out 17/07/2020

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

When war broke out in 1939, Hitler created 'Strafbattalion' (Penal Battalion) units to deal with incarcerated members of the Wehrmacht as well as 'subversives.' His order stated that any first-time convicted soldier could return to his unit after he had served a portion of his sentence in 'a special probation corps before the enemy.' Beginning in April 1941, convicted soldiers--even those sentenced to death--who had shown exceptional bravery or meritorious service were allowed to rejoin their original units. However those in probation units were expected to undertake dangerous operations at the front. Refusal entailed enforcement of the original sentence. The soldiers who 'win back an honorable place in the national community' had done everything that was asked of them: risky advance teams, spyware and shock troops, laying mines under enemy fire. This book examines the penal units, their combat history and order of battle.

Includes bibliographical references

When war broke out in 1939, Hitler created `Strafbattalion' (Penal Battalion) units to deal with incarcerated members of the Wehrmacht as well as `subversives'. His order stated that any first-time convicted soldier could return to his unit after he had served a portion of his sentence in `a special probation corps before the enemy'. Beginning in April 1941, convicted soldiers-even those sentenced to death-who had shown exceptional bravery or meritorious service were allowed to rejoin their original units. However those in probation units were expected to undertake dangerous operations at the front. Refusal entailed enforcement of the original sentence. The soldiers who `win back an honourable place in the national community' had done everything that was asked of them: risky advance teams, spyware and shock troops, laying mines under enemy fire. This book examines the penal units, their combat history and order of battle.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Preface (p. 5)
  • Introduction (p. 9)
  • 1 The Nazi Penal System (p. 21)
  • 2 The Creation of Penal Units (p. 34)
  • 3 The Classification and Organization of Penal Units (p. 46)
  • Parole Units (p. 46)
  • Second Class Soldiers (p. 46)
  • Probation Units (p. 47)
  • 999 Units (p. 54)
  • Field Custody Detachments (p. 59)
  • Punishment Trains (p. 65)
  • Order of Battle as of July 1,1942 (p. 66)
  • Field Special Battalions (p. 69)
  • Field Police (p. 71)
  • Wehrmacht Prisons (p. 74)
  • 4 SS Parachute Battalions (p. 77)
  • 500th SS Parachute Battalion (p. 77)
  • 600th SS Parachute Battalion (p. 81)
  • 5 36th Waffen SS Grenadier Division (p. 82)
  • Order of Battle (p. 88)
  • 6 Storm and Infantry Units (p. 89)
  • 440th Sturm Division Rhodos (p. 89)
  • Order of Battle (p. 90)
  • "502nd SS Light Infantry Battalion (p. 93)
  • SS Commando Group Centre (p. 94)
  • Infantry Units (p. 95)
  • 999th Fortress Infantry Battalion (p. 99)
  • 7 999th Light Africa Division (p. 109)
  • Order of Battle (p. 114)
  • 8 The German Replacement Army (p. 116)
  • Wehrkreis (Military Districts) (p. 120)
  • 9 Kriegsmarine and Luftwaffe Units (p. 123)
  • Kriegsmarine (p. 123)
  • Luftwaffe (p. 126)
  • 10 Guilt by Association (p. 146)
  • Epilogue (p. 149)
  • Appendix I Military Organizations of the Third Reich (p. 152)
  • Appendix II German Army Group North: As of October 13,1944 (p. 161)
  • Appendix III German Army Group Centre: As of April 22, 1942 (p. 167)
  • Appendix IV German Army Group South: As of December 26, 1943 (p. 181)
  • Appendix V German Army Group F (South-East): As of October 4, 1943 (p. 194)
  • Appendix VI German Army Group B: As of January 1, 1943 (p. 199)
  • Appendix VII German Army Group G: As of October 18,1944 (p. 206)
  • Endnotes (p. 212)
  • Bibliography (p. 221)