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In the fall they come back : a novel / Robert Bausch.

By: Bausch, Robert [author.].
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York, NY : Bloomsbury USA, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 2017Copyright date: ©2017Description: 398 pages ; 25 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781632864000; 1632864002.Subject(s): English teachers -- Fiction | Teachers -- Fiction | Interpersonal relations -- Fiction | Teacher-student relationships -- Fiction | Preparatory schools -- Fiction | Private schools -- Fiction | Schools -- Fiction | Teachers -- Fiction | Virginia -- FictionGenre/Form: Domestic fiction. DDC classification: 813/.54 Summary: "Ben Jameson begins his teaching career in a small private school in Northern Virginia. He is idealistic, happy to have his first job after graduate school and hoping some day to figure out what he really wants out of life. In the two years he teaches English at Glenn Acres Preparatory School, he discovers what he believes will be his life's work; teaching is what he finally comes to with all his heart. His fiance believes he suffers from a 'Christ complex, ' that he wants to 'save the world' entire by involving himself in the lives of his students. Three students in particular, draw him in: an abused boy, a mute and damaged girl, and a dangerous but utterly beautiful 18 year old woman who has come back to school for one more chance to graduate. His attempts to 'save' these students lead him to territory his mentor and friend, the oldest teacher at Glenn Acres, Professor Bible, tells him he should not be in. It's a book about giving; it's about the nature of help--and it takes on the true complexity of that urge as it plays out in that most fraught (and yet common) of settings, a school. It is a book that explores both human frailty and the limits of benevolence."--Page 4 of cover.
List(s) this item appears in: Book Chat Fiction notes: Click to open in new window
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Fiction Collection
Fiction Collection BAUS Checked out 28/05/2021 T00803323
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

<p> A brilliantly observed prep school novel about fraught teacher-student relationships--and about coming into adulthood. </p> <p>Ben Jameson begins his teaching career in a small private school in Northern Virginia. He is idealistic, happy to have his first job after graduate school, and hoping some day to figure out what he really wants out of life. And in his two years teaching English at Glenn Acres Preparatory School, he comes to believe this really is his life's work, his calling. He wants to change lives.</p> <p>But his desire to "save" his students leads him into complicated territory, as he becomes more and more deeply involved with three students in particular: an abused boy, a mute and damaged girl, and a dangerous eighteen-year-old who has come back to school for one more chance to graduate.</p> <p> In the Fall They Come Back is a book about human relationships, as played out in that most fraught of settings, a school. But it is not only a book about teaching. It is about the limits and complexities of even our most benevolent urges--what we can give to others and how we lose ourselves.</p>

"Ben Jameson begins his teaching career in a small private school in Northern Virginia. He is idealistic, happy to have his first job after graduate school and hoping some day to figure out what he really wants out of life. In the two years he teaches English at Glenn Acres Preparatory School, he discovers what he believes will be his life's work; teaching is what he finally comes to with all his heart. His fiance believes he suffers from a 'Christ complex, ' that he wants to 'save the world' entire by involving himself in the lives of his students. Three students in particular, draw him in: an abused boy, a mute and damaged girl, and a dangerous but utterly beautiful 18 year old woman who has come back to school for one more chance to graduate. His attempts to 'save' these students lead him to territory his mentor and friend, the oldest teacher at Glenn Acres, Professor Bible, tells him he should not be in. It's a book about giving; it's about the nature of help--and it takes on the true complexity of that urge as it plays out in that most fraught (and yet common) of settings, a school. It is a book that explores both human frailty and the limits of benevolence."--Page 4 of cover.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

How involved should teachers be in the lives of their students? This question is at the heart of Bausch's latest novel, set in the hothouse atmosphere of a private high school in the northern Virginia suburbs. Narrator Ben Jameson looks back on his brief career as a teacher at Glenn Acres Prep in 1985. As a new teacher, Ben believes he can make a difference, especially in the lives of three damaged young people in his class. George is abused by his bully of a father, Suzanne is a trauma victim who moves silently through the halls like a ghost, and Leslie is a troublemaker, a beautiful but spoiled and willful daughter of wealthy parents. She is the one all the other teachers warn Ben about, but he, by turns cynical and idealistic, still thinks he can help these kids turn their lives around. But will he go too far in doing so? VERDICT The author of many works of fiction (The Legend of Jesse Smoke; Far as the Eye Can See), Bausch this time presents an absorbing character study of a young man who may not understand his students-or himself-as well as he thinks he does.--Leslie Patterson, Rehoboth, MA © Copyright 2017. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Publishers Weekly Review

Bausch tells the penetrating story of idealistic, newly graduated Ben Jameson, a hopeful young English teacher at Glenn Acres Preparatory School in Virginia. Enchanted by his own grandiose notions of inspiring young minds and changing young peoples' lives, Ben flouts the typical English lesson plans, as well as the conventions of teacher-student relationships; he wants to "get in amongst them and stir them up." Despite warnings from his girlfriend, the school principal, and more experienced (and more cynical) colleagues, Ben becomes increasingly involved in the lives of his students: he wonders at one student's history of sexual molestation, he hopes to save another from abuse, and he becomes enraptured by a beautiful but troubled girl who has returned to the school for a fifth year with one last chance to graduate. Bausch perceptively explores the complexities and dangers of idealism and the motivations behind altruism. The book's greatest strength is its portrayal of the earnest yet misguided Ben as being ignorant to the fact that the more he "helps," the more damage he inflicts. (Dec.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Booklist Review

Looking back nearly a quarter century, Ben Jameson, now a government attorney, reflects on the two years he spent in the mid-1980s as an English teacher at a private school in Virginia. Fresh out of graduate school, Jameson was barely older than his students. Whether it was proximity in age or a God complex, Jameson displayed a heightened empathy for three troubled teens: George, suffering physical and emotional abuse by his father; Suzanne, another abuse victim, so traumatized she is unable to speak or make eye contact; and Leslie, whose beauty belies a manipulative but fragile persona. Though always couched in the guise of his role as a concerned educator, Jameson nonetheless insinuates himself into their lives in inappropriate and even tragic ways. Bausch's (The Legend of Jesse Smoke, 2016) unreliable narrator offers a mid-life contemplation of a brief career abounding in delusions and rationalizations that do the opposite of clarifying the events that still haunt him. Readers will be haunted by Bausch's eerie psychological portrait of a young man who grasped too much power too soon.--Haggas, Carol Copyright 2017 Booklist

Kirkus Book Review

A young teacher mismanages relationships with his students at a small private school in Virginia.After announcing that "what follows is based on a true story," Bausch (The Legend of Jesse Smoke, 2016, etc.) opens his latest novel with ruminations. "What happened to me in those two short years may have been a consequence of some fault in the understanding between teacher and student, but it changed the world for me in ways I'm still contemplating. This is not a story about teaching. Nor is it about education, or school, although most of what happened started in a school. This is a story about caring a little too much; or maybe about not caring enough. I really don't know which. The only thing I know for certain is that I wish a lot of it did not happen." Readers may feel he should perhaps have settled some of these matters in his mind before embarking on this account, in which the trouble ahead is signaled so often that it is almost an anticlimax when it occurs. By that time, the narrator has thoroughly convinced us of his lack of aptitude for teaching, his immaturity, and his irresponsibility in handling his students' personal problems. He has one who is being physically abused, another who refuses to speak or make eye contact, and one who is so beautiful that he, a 25-year-old with a live-in girlfriend, is unable to think straight in her presence. His half-hearted attempt to teach writing involves showing the students movies about the Holocaust and having them keep copious personal journals. Supposedly they can fold a page to request it not be read, but in fact, both he and the head of the school read whatever they want. Most of the time, he admits, it's all so tedious, he just writes comments in the margin"Thank you for sharing"; "It's good to be honest"without even reading what's there. This is probably exactly what really happeneddown to the dog who craps in the classroombut that's not good enough in a novel. Vivid details and tricky situations fail to come together to create a compelling or meaningful story. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.