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Craeft : how traditional crafts are about more than just making / Alexander Langlands.

By: Langlands, Alexander.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: London, England : Faber & Faber, 2017Publisher: ©2017Description: 344 pages ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780571324408; 0571324401.Other title: Craft.Subject(s): Material culture -- Europe -- History | Workmanship -- History | Artisans -- Europe -- History | Handicraft industries -- Europe -- History | Handicraft -- History | Antiquities, Prehistoric -- EuropeGenre/Form: History.DDC classification: 306.4/6094
Contents:
Defining cræft -- Making hay -- Sticks and stones -- Grenja'arsta'ur -- The skep-making beekeeper -- Taming the wilds -- Weft and warp -- Under thatch -- The shoe and the harness -- Seed and sward -- The oxna mere -- Fire and earth -- The craft of digging -- Baskets and boats.
Summary: In a period of meaningless mass manufacturing, our growing appetite for hand-made objects, artisan food, and craft beverages reveals our deep cravings for tradition and quality. But there was a time when craft meant something very different; the Old English word craeft possessed an almost indefinable sense of knowledge, wisdom, and power. In this fascinating book, historian and popular broadcaster Alex Langlands goes in search of the mysterious lost meaning of craeft. Through a vibrant series of mini-histories, told with his trademark energy and charm, Langlands resurrects the ancient craftspeople who fused exquisite skill with back-breaking labour - and passionately defends the renewed importance of craeft today.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due
Non-Fiction Hakeke Street Library
Non-Fiction (NEST)
Non-Fiction (NEST) 306.46 LAN Available

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

In the modern world we are becoming bombarded by craft. Hand-made tools, artisan breads and craft beers are all part of a pantheon of goods designed to appeal to our earthier selves, our sense of tradition, quality and luxury, all brought together through a personal touch - objects to savour in a world of meaningless mass manufacture. But once, craft - or more specifically, cræft - meant something very different. When it was first written down in Old English, over a thousand years ago, it had an almost indefinable sense of 'knowledge', 'wisdom' and 'power'. To be cræfty was to be truly intelligent - but in a way that is almost inconceivable to us today. Through a series of mini-histories, detailed craft analyses and personal anecdotes, archaeologist, historian and broadcaster Alexander Langlands goes in search of the lost knowledge of cræft . Fusing stories of landscapes, personalities and mesmerising skill, with back-breaking hard work, this book will convince readers - for their health, wealth and well-being - to introduce more cræft into their lives.

Includes index.

Defining cræft -- Making hay -- Sticks and stones -- Grenja'arsta'ur -- The skep-making beekeeper -- Taming the wilds -- Weft and warp -- Under thatch -- The shoe and the harness -- Seed and sward -- The oxna mere -- Fire and earth -- The craft of digging -- Baskets and boats.

In a period of meaningless mass manufacturing, our growing appetite for hand-made objects, artisan food, and craft beverages reveals our deep cravings for tradition and quality. But there was a time when craft meant something very different; the Old English word craeft possessed an almost indefinable sense of knowledge, wisdom, and power. In this fascinating book, historian and popular broadcaster Alex Langlands goes in search of the mysterious lost meaning of craeft. Through a vibrant series of mini-histories, told with his trademark energy and charm, Langlands resurrects the ancient craftspeople who fused exquisite skill with back-breaking labour - and passionately defends the renewed importance of craeft today.