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The stolen marriage / Diane Chamberlain.

By: Chamberlain, Diane, 1950-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: London, England : Macmillan, 2017Copyright date: ©2017Description: 376 pages ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781509884650; 1509884653; 9781509808533; 1509808531.Subject(s): Families -- Fiction | Married people -- Fiction | Secrecy -- Fiction | Interpersonal relations -- Fiction | Mediums -- Fiction | Epidemics -- Fiction | North Carolina -- FictionGenre/Form: Domestic fiction.DDC classification: 813.6 Summary: In 1944, twenty-three-year-old Tess DeMello abruptly ends her engagement to the love of her life when she marries a mysterious stranger and moves to Hickory, North Carolina, a small town struggling with racial tension and the hardships imposed by World War II. Tess's new husband, Henry Kraft, is a secretive man who often stays out all night, hides money from his new wife, and shows no interest in making love. Tess quickly realizes she's trapped in a strange and loveless marriage with no way out. The people of Hickory love and respect Henry and see Tess as an outsider, treating her with suspicion and disdain, especially after one of the town's prominent citizens dies in a terrible accident and Tess is blamed. Tess suspects people are talking about her, plotting behind her back, and following her as she walks around town. What does everyone know about Henry that she does not? Feeling alone and adrift, Tess turns to the one person who seems to understand her, a local medium who gives her hope but seems to know more than he's letting on. When a sudden polio epidemic strikes the town, the townspeople band together to build a polio hospital. Tess, who has a nursing degree, bucks Henry's wishes and begins to work at the hospital, finding meaning in nursing the young victims. Yet at home, Henry's actions grow more alarming by the day. As Tess works to save the lives of her patients, can she untangle her husband's mysterious behavior and save her own life?
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Fiction Collection CHAM Checked out 03/09/2018

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

In 1944, twenty-three-year-old Tess DeMello abruptly ends her engagement to the love of her life when she marries a mysterious stranger and moves to Hickory, North Carolina. Hickory is a small town struggling with racial tension and the hardships imposed by World War II. Tess's new husband, Henry Kraft, is a secretive man who often stays out all night, hides money from his new wife, and shows no interest in making love. Tess quickly realizes she's trapped in a strange and loveless marriage with no way out. The people of Hickory love and respect Henry and see Tess as an outsider, treating her with suspicion and disdain, especially after one of the town's prominent citizens dies in a terrible accident and Tess is blamed for the death. Tess suspects people are talking about her, plotting behind her back, and following her as she walks around town. What does everyone know about Henry that she does not? Feeling alone and adrift in a hostile town, Tess turns to the one person who seems to understand her - a local medium who gives her hope but seems to know more than he's letting on. When a sudden polio epidemic strikes the town, taking the lives of some of its children, including a boy well known to the Kraft family, the townspeople band together to build a polio hospital in less than three days. Tess, who has a nursing degree, bucks Henry's wishes and begins to work at the hospital, finding meaning in nursing the young victims. Yet at home, Henry's actions grow more baffling and alarming by the day. As Tess works to save the lives of her patients, can she untangle her husband's mysterious behavior and save her own life?

Includes bibliographical references (p. 376)

In 1944, twenty-three-year-old Tess DeMello abruptly ends her engagement to the love of her life when she marries a mysterious stranger and moves to Hickory, North Carolina, a small town struggling with racial tension and the hardships imposed by World War II. Tess's new husband, Henry Kraft, is a secretive man who often stays out all night, hides money from his new wife, and shows no interest in making love. Tess quickly realizes she's trapped in a strange and loveless marriage with no way out. The people of Hickory love and respect Henry and see Tess as an outsider, treating her with suspicion and disdain, especially after one of the town's prominent citizens dies in a terrible accident and Tess is blamed. Tess suspects people are talking about her, plotting behind her back, and following her as she walks around town. What does everyone know about Henry that she does not? Feeling alone and adrift, Tess turns to the one person who seems to understand her, a local medium who gives her hope but seems to know more than he's letting on. When a sudden polio epidemic strikes the town, the townspeople band together to build a polio hospital. Tess, who has a nursing degree, bucks Henry's wishes and begins to work at the hospital, finding meaning in nursing the young victims. Yet at home, Henry's actions grow more alarming by the day. As Tess works to save the lives of her patients, can she untangle her husband's mysterious behavior and save her own life?

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

It is 1944, and the war effort molds a sense of duty for the townspeople of Hickory, NC. The divide between races is strict, with tensions running high. After breaking off her engagement to the man of her heart, Tess DeMello has surprisingly found herself married to Henry Kraft, the son of Hickory's most powerful family and a man she does not love. Although her future seems hopeless, Tess learns just who she is and what she is made of as she struggles to stay true to her own moral code in the midst of a polio epidemic. The surprise is that Henry has his own compelling backstory. And Tess herself has complicated, by her own ethics, the happiness of those she truly loves. Verdict Secrets, intrigue, mystery, love, forgiveness, and drama-it's all here. And it is riveting. Chamberlain's (Pretending To Dance) latest novel demands the reader to race, yet savor, the journey to the finale. [See Prepub Alert, 4/10/17.]-Susan Carr, Edwardsville P.L., IL © Copyright 2017. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Publishers Weekly Review

Bestseller Chamberlain (Necessary Lies) conveys a strong sense of daily life in the American South during WWII, and the concurrent devastation of the polio epidemic, in this well-crafted crime-tinged tale of a marriage of convenience. Theresa "Tess" DeMello, a 23-year-old nurse-in-training, and Henry "Hank" Kraft meet via a chance encounter during an unchaperoned trip to Washington, D.C.; alcohol and bad decision-making result in Tess's pregnancy and their subsequent wedding. Tess relocates from Baltimore to Hank's hometown of Hickory, N.C., where his family owns a furniture factory. One morning, Tess agrees to drive her sister-in-law, Lucy, on an errand in an attempt to improve their strained relationship. Lucy hints at dark secrets in Henry's life that Tess is not privy to, and requests a detour to deliver a mysterious envelope-a detour with fatal consequences. Details like Tess's Catholic background, casual cultural biases, and the balance she strikes between independence and suppression of her own personality, in response to her husband and in-laws, enrich the story. Agent: Susan Ginsburg, Writers House. (Oct.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Booklist Review

Tess and Vinnie's plan to marry was as organic as Catholicism in Little Italy they grew up together, they fell in love. Despite WWII and numerous wedding postponements, the future looked good for their dream of working together as doctor and nurse. Until Tess visits the big city and makes a mistake: she gets drunk, loses her virginity to a stranger, and becomes pregnant. Instead of confessing to Vinnie (or her family), or risking a 1944-style abortion, she runs to Hickory, North Carolina, and marries the baby's father. WWII values aside, this novel is improbable on several levels. It partly redeems itself, however, by creating a realistic historical perspective on the polio epidemic (Vinnie's area of expertise) and on one heroic rural town famous for its polio hospital. Compelling details of patients' experiences, treatment of African Americans and of women, plus a tinge of mystery will all hold readers' interest in this veteran author's latest. Combines the issue-driven style of Jodi Picoult, the romantic tension of Nora Roberts, and the life-defining-mistake motif of Amy Hatvany's It Happens All the Time (2017).--Baker, Jen Copyright 2017 Booklist

Kirkus Book Review

A series of unfortunate errors consigns a Baltimore nurse to a loveless marriage in the South.It's 1943, and Tess, from Baltimore's Little Italy, is eagerly anticipating her upcoming nuptials. Her frustration grows, though, when her physician fiance, Vincent, accepts an extended out-of-town assignment to treat polio patients. On an impromptu excursion to Washington, D.C., Tess has too many martinis, resulting in a one-night stand with a chance acquaintance, a furniture manufacturer from North Carolina named Henry. Back in Baltimore, Tess' extreme Catholic guilt over her indiscretion is compounded by the discovery that she's pregnant. Eschewing a back-street abortion, she seeks out Henry in hopes of arranging child supportbut to her shock, he proposes marriage instead. Once married to Henry and ensconced in his family mansion in Hickory, North Carolina, Tess gets a frosty reception from Henry's mother, Miss Ruth, and his sister, Lucy, not to mention the other ladies of Hickory, especially Violet, who thought she was Henry's fiancee. Tess' isolation worsens after Lucy dies in a freak car accident, and Tess, the driver, is blamed. Her only friends are the African-American servants of the household and an African-American medium who helps her make peace with a growing number of unquiet spirits, including her mother, who expired of shock over Tess' predicament, and Lucy, not to mention the baby, who did not make it to full term. The marriage is passionless but benign. Although Henry tries to be domineering, he always relents, letting Tess take the nurses' licensing exam and, later, go to work in Hickory's historic polio hospital. Strangely, despite the pregnancy's end, he refuses to divorce Tess. There are hints throughout that Henry has secrets; Lucy herself intimates as much shortly before her death. Once the polio hospital story takes over, the accident is largely forgotten, leading readers to suspect that Lucy's death was a convenient way of postponing crucial revelations about Henry. Things develop predictably until, suddenly and belatedly, the plot heats up in an unpredictable but also unconvincing way. An overly anodyne attempt at Southern gothic. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.