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Old Masters rock : how to look at art with children / Maria-Christina Sayn-Wittgenstein Nottebohm.

By: Sayn-Wittgenstein Nottebohm, Maria [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: [London] : Pimpernel Press, [2016]Copyright date: �2016Description: 112 pages : illustrations ; 28 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 1910258040; 9781910258040.Subject(s): Art appreciation | Arts and children | Painting -- Appreciation | Art -- TechniqueDDC classification: 701.18
Contents:
Looking at art -- Animals -- Natural world -- Royalty -- Families -- Fabulous faces -- Action & heroes -- Art & culture -- At home -- Angels & devils -- Science & technology -- Myth & magic -- Towns & villages -- News ofd the day.
Summary: "Enjoying art is all about responding to what you are seeing. Parents often lack confidence about how to look at art with children, however, there is no magic secret and there are no right or wrong answers. Old Masters Rock: How to Look at Art with Children demystifies western art and demonstrates that it is accessible to all of us – adults and children alike. Old Masters Rock is a book for parents and children to look at together. It introduces the type of questions that help us discover things about a work of art and how we feel about it. Whether you are an adult or a child curiosity should be your starting point as it reveals what interests you in a painting. Features such as ‘Art Detectives’ encourage children to solve clues and 'Fun Facts' help them remember the pictures. Throughout, the emphasis is on looking at the paintings and drawing one’s own conclusions about what one is seeing. Grouped into thirteen themes ... 50 paintings from the fourteenth century through to the early twentieth century are featured. Different styles, from the early Renaissance, through Baroque, Mannerist, Realist and Impressionist, are included. Well-known artists such as Leonardo da Vinci, Holbein, Rubens, Velasquez, Constable, Degas, Manet, Van Gogh and Munch are featured, as well as less familiar artists who will quickly become favourites"--Publisher's website.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due
Non-Fiction Mobile Library
Children's Non-fiction
Children's Non-fiction 701.18 SAY Available

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Enjoying art is all about responding to what you are seeing. Parents often lack confidence about how to look at art with children, however, there is no magic secret and there are no right or wrong answers. Old Masters Rock: How to Look at Art with Children demystifies western art and demonstrates that it is accessible to all of us - adults and children alike. Old Masters Rock is a book for parents and children to look at together. It introduces the type of questions that help us discover things about a work of art and how we feel about it. Whether you are an adult or a child curiosity should be your starting point as it reveals what interests you in a painting. Features such as 'Art Detectives' encourage children to solve clues and 'Fun Facts' help them remember the pictures. Throughout, the emphasis is on looking at the paintings and drawing one's own conclusions about what one is seeing. Grouped into thirteen themes such as Animals, the Natural World, Action Heroes, Myth & Magic, Fabulous Faces and others, 50 paintings from the fourteenth century through to the early twentieth century are featured. Different styles, from the early Renaissance, through Baroque, Mannerist, Realist and Impressionist, are included. Well-known artists such as Leonardo da Vinci, Holbein, Rubens, Velasquez, Constable, Degas, Manet, Van Gogh and Munch are featured, as well as less familiar artists who will quickly become favourites.

Includes index.

Looking at art -- Animals -- Natural world -- Royalty -- Families -- Fabulous faces -- Action & heroes -- Art & culture -- At home -- Angels & devils -- Science & technology -- Myth & magic -- Towns & villages -- News ofd the day.

"Enjoying art is all about responding to what you are seeing. Parents often lack confidence about how to look at art with children, however, there is no magic secret and there are no right or wrong answers. Old Masters Rock: How to Look at Art with Children demystifies western art and demonstrates that it is accessible to all of us – adults and children alike. Old Masters Rock is a book for parents and children to look at together. It introduces the type of questions that help us discover things about a work of art and how we feel about it. Whether you are an adult or a child curiosity should be your starting point as it reveals what interests you in a painting. Features such as ‘Art Detectives’ encourage children to solve clues and 'Fun Facts' help them remember the pictures. Throughout, the emphasis is on looking at the paintings and drawing one’s own conclusions about what one is seeing. Grouped into thirteen themes ... 50 paintings from the fourteenth century through to the early twentieth century are featured. Different styles, from the early Renaissance, through Baroque, Mannerist, Realist and Impressionist, are included. Well-known artists such as Leonardo da Vinci, Holbein, Rubens, Velasquez, Constable, Degas, Manet, Van Gogh and Munch are featured, as well as less familiar artists who will quickly become favourites"--Publisher's website.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Publishers Weekly Review

Nottebohm highlights 50 paintings in a book designed for children and parents to explore together; a dozen chapters explore such artistic themes as royalty, families, and religion. Large reproductions of the paintings appear opposite Nottebohm's commentary about their creators and creation, and dozens of questions, set off in italics, urge readers to closely examine and consider each work. For Jean-Étienne Liotard's Woman in Turkish Dress, Seated on a Sofa, she ponders the contents of a torn letter on the carpet: "Who do you think wrote the letter? Do you think it was the same person she had dressed herself up for?" A fine introduction to Brueghel, Delacroix, Rembrandt, and other painters that actively encourages readers to develop visual literacy through observation and imagination. Ages 7-12. (Aug.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Kirkus Book Review

This handsomely produced British import coaches parents and teachers on how best to introduce their children to fine art and also serves as a lively learning prompt for future connoisseursart-loving kids with a voracious desire to explore and experience and enjoy as much art as they can. After a thoughtful, brief rationale and a tip-filled introduction to "Looking at Art," fine-art blogger Nottebohm tours readers through major art collections in the United States and in Europe and stops in front of 50 significant works of Western painting. In each two-page spread she offers an immersive, insight-rich, and accessible curator's talk with just the right amount of kidcentric detail and disarmingly honest Q-and-As to keep young art lovers deeply engaged. Inspired by countless trips to museums with her own son and his friends, Nottebohm reassures parents that no work of art is too effete for curious kids and that the internet is a fine resource for virtual gallery visits (you can look as long as you like and zoom in on detail). She encourages families to prepare for their art-viewing trips together and let their children manage the map and guide the museum tour. Selections are heavy on canonical works, with no obvious representation from artists of color or, in fact, any nonfigurative art at all. Though a glossary would have helpednot everyone knows what "gesso" isand the scope is limited, most will enjoy return visits with these old masters. (index) (Nonfiction. 8-12) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.