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Precarity : uncertain, insecure and unequal lives in Aotearoa New Zealand / edited by Shiloh Groot, Clifford van Ommen, Bridgette Masters-Awatere and Natasha Tassell-Matamua.

Contributor(s): Groot, Shiloh [editor.] | Van Ommen, Clifford [editor.] | Masters-Awatere, Bridgette [editor.] | Tassell-Matamua, Natasha [editor.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Auckland, New Zealand : Massey University Press, 2017Copyright date: ©2017Description: 271 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780994141514; 0994141513.Subject(s): Precarious employment -- New Zealand | Casual labour -- New Zealand | Minimum wage -- New Zealand | Working poor -- New Zealand | Poverty -- New Zealand | Maori (New Zealand people) -- Social conditions | Maori (New Zealand people) -- Economic conditions | Whiwhinga mahi | New Zealand -- Social conditionsDDC classification: 331.5440993
Contents:
Part 1 : Selling snake oil -- Part 2 : Native disruption, Māori and the precariat -- Part 3 : Arrivals past and present.
Summary: "Leading British economist Guy Standing has referred to the precariat as a class-in-the-making. The precariat are our fellow citizens - be they poor, elderly, disabled, homeless, estranged from their cultural communities, refugees, engaged in casual work - who lead lives of uncertainty, dependency, powerlessness, perilousness and insufficiency. They are the outcome of the gradual dismantling of the welfare state and the withering of union representation. They are also the victims of the changing nature of work. This important book moves beyond the world of labour to identify and illustrate other forms of precarity in New Zealand, including the lack of opportunities for cultural expression and the struggle to be safe. It focuses on New Zealand's emerging class not to further vilify it but rather to place its members' lived experience in plain sight. As the editors say, 'It is time that all New Zealanders understood the reality of what many of our citizens endure in the struggle to make ends meet and live dignified lives.'"--Cover.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Leading UK economist Guy Standing has referred to the precariat as a class-in-the-making. The Precariat are our fellow citizens -- be they poor, elderly, disabled, homeless, estranged from their cultural communities, refugees, engaged in casual work -- who lead lives of uncertainty, dependency, powerlessness, perilousness and insufficiency. They are the outcome of the gradual dismantling of the welfare state and the withering of union representation. They are also the victims of the changing nature of work. This important book moves beyond the world of labour to identify and illustrate other forms of precarity in New Zealand, including the lack of opportunities for cultural expression and the struggle to be safe. It focuses on New Zealand's emerging class, not to further vilify it but rather to place its members' lived experience in plain sight. As the editors say, 'It is time that all New Zealanders understood the reality of what many of our citizens endure in the struggle to make ends meet and live dignified lives.'

Includes bibliographical references.

Part 1 : Selling snake oil -- Part 2 : Native disruption, Māori and the precariat -- Part 3 : Arrivals past and present.

"Leading British economist Guy Standing has referred to the precariat as a class-in-the-making. The precariat are our fellow citizens - be they poor, elderly, disabled, homeless, estranged from their cultural communities, refugees, engaged in casual work - who lead lives of uncertainty, dependency, powerlessness, perilousness and insufficiency. They are the outcome of the gradual dismantling of the welfare state and the withering of union representation. They are also the victims of the changing nature of work. This important book moves beyond the world of labour to identify and illustrate other forms of precarity in New Zealand, including the lack of opportunities for cultural expression and the struggle to be safe. It focuses on New Zealand's emerging class not to further vilify it but rather to place its members' lived experience in plain sight. As the editors say, 'It is time that all New Zealanders understood the reality of what many of our citizens endure in the struggle to make ends meet and live dignified lives.'"--Cover.