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NASA/ESA/ASI Cassini-Huygens : 1997-2017 : (Cassini orbiter, Huygens probe and future exploration concepts) : owner's workshop manual : an insight into the technology, mission planning and operation of spacecraft designed to study Saturn's moon, Titan and the Saturnian system / Ralph Lorenz.

By: Lorenz, Ralph, 1969-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Owners workshop manual (Haynes): Publisher: Sparkford, England : Haynes Publishing, 2017Copyright date: ©2017Description: 196 pages : illustrations ; 28 cm.Content type: text | still image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781785211119 (hbk.); 1785211110 (hbk.).Subject(s): Space vehicles -- Design and construction | Saturn probesDDC classification: 629.43546 Summary: The descent of the Huygens probe to the frozen surface of Saturn's moon, Titan, in 2005, is the most distant planetary landing ever made or presently foreseen. The Huygens probe's seven-year voyage through space (past Venus, Earth and Jupiter) attached to the Cassini orbiter, its arrival at Saturn and three-week dormant coast to Saturn's moon, Titan, culminated in Huygens' hypersonic entry into Titan's atmosphere, parachute descent, and continued operation for 72 minutes on the surface transmitting data back to Earth via the Cassini orbiter. Titan – one of Saturn’s 62 confirmed moons – was chosen due to the presence of nitrogen and oxygen. If Titan received more sunlight, its atmosphere might well resemble that of a primitive Earth. In autumn 2017, the mission will come to an end, when the Cassini orbiter plunges into Saturn's atmosphere. Here is the detailed story of how the spacecraft were designed, the technology used, how the mission was planned, and what the project scientists have discovered. -- Publisher information.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

The descent of the Huygens probe to the frozen surface of Saturn's moon, Titan, in 2005, marks a pinnacle achievement in space exploration - the most distant planetary landing ever made or presently foreseen. The Huygens probe's seven-year voyage through space (past Venus, Earth and Jupiter) attached to the Cassini orbiter, its arrival at Saturn and three-week dormant coast to Saturn's moon, Titan, culminated in Huygens' hypersonic entry into Titan's atmosphere, 2.5-hour parachute descent, and continued operation for 72 minutes on the surface transmitting date back to Earth via the Cassini orbiter. Saturn has 62 confirmed orbiting moons, but Titan (which is larger than the planet Mercury) was chosen as a has two major components of Earth's atmosphere - nitrogen and oxygen - but the oxygen is was thought to be frozen as water ice within the body of the moon. If Titan received more sunlight, its atmosphere might well resemble that of a primitive Earth. The hope is that study of the data gathered about Titan will help us to understand how the Earth evolved, and possibly what led to the evolution of life.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

The descent of the Huygens probe to the frozen surface of Saturn's moon, Titan, in 2005, is the most distant planetary landing ever made or presently foreseen. The Huygens probe's seven-year voyage through space (past Venus, Earth and Jupiter) attached to the Cassini orbiter, its arrival at Saturn and three-week dormant coast to Saturn's moon, Titan, culminated in Huygens' hypersonic entry into Titan's atmosphere, parachute descent, and continued operation for 72 minutes on the surface transmitting data back to Earth via the Cassini orbiter. Titan – one of Saturn’s 62 confirmed moons – was chosen due to the presence of nitrogen and oxygen. If Titan received more sunlight, its atmosphere might well resemble that of a primitive Earth. In autumn 2017, the mission will come to an end, when the Cassini orbiter plunges into Saturn's atmosphere. Here is the detailed story of how the spacecraft were designed, the technology used, how the mission was planned, and what the project scientists have discovered. -- Publisher information.