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War and the death of news : reflections of a grade B reporter / Martin Bell.

By: Bell, Martin, 1938-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: London, England : Oneworld, 2017Description: 295 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (some color) ; 24 cm.Content type: text | still image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781786071088; 1786071088.Subject(s): Bell, Martin, 1938- | War correspondents | Journalists -- Biography | Mass media and war | War in mass mediaGenre/Form: Autobiographies.DDC classification: 070.433092
Contents:
Once a soldier -- Geunyeli -- Undertones of war -- Lessons of Vietnam -- Victor's justice -- The something must be done club -- The violent screen -- Never wrong for long -- The age of the embed -- The language of war -- 'Trust me... I'm a journalist' -- 'Totally unsuited to politics...' -- No man's land -- Terrorism and jihad -- Iraq, the reckoning -- Observations -- Golden rules of TV news -- The death of news.
Summary: Martin Bell has stood in war zones as both a soldier and a journalist. From Vietnam to Bosnia to Iraq, he has witnessed first-hand the dramatic changes in how conflicts are fought and how they are reported. He has seen the truth degraded in the name of balance and good taste, grief and pain censored so the viewers are not disturbed. In an age of international terror, where journalists themselves have become targets, more and more reports are issued from the sidelines. The dominance of social media has ushered in a post-truth world: Twitter rumours and unverifiable videos abound, and TV news seeks to entertain rather than inform. In this compelling account, one of the outstanding journalists of our time provides a moving, personal account of war and issues, and an impassioned call to put the substance back in our news.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due
Non-Fiction Gonville Library
Biographies
Biographies B BEL Available

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Martin Bell has stood in war zones as both a soldier and a journalist. From Vietnam to Bosnia to Iraq, he has witnessed first-hand the dramatic changes in how conflicts are fought and how they are reported. He has seen the truth degraded in the name of balance and good taste - grief and pain censored so the viewers are not disturbed.

In an age of international terror, where journalists themselves have become targets, more and more reports are issued from the sidelines. The dominance of social media has ushered in a post-truth world: Twitter rumours and unverifiable videos abound, and TV news seeks to entertain rather than inform.

In this compelling account, one of the outstanding journalists of our time provides a moving, personal account of war and issues an impassioned call to put the substance back in our news.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Once a soldier -- Geunyeli -- Undertones of war -- Lessons of Vietnam -- Victor's justice -- The something must be done club -- The violent screen -- Never wrong for long -- The age of the embed -- The language of war -- 'Trust me... I'm a journalist' -- 'Totally unsuited to politics...' -- No man's land -- Terrorism and jihad -- Iraq, the reckoning -- Observations -- Golden rules of TV news -- The death of news.

Martin Bell has stood in war zones as both a soldier and a
journalist. From Vietnam to Bosnia to Iraq, he has witnessed first-hand the dramatic changes in how conflicts are fought and how they are reported. He has seen the truth degraded in the name of balance and good taste, grief and pain censored so the viewers are not disturbed. In an age of international terror, where journalists themselves have become targets, more and more reports are issued from the sidelines. The dominance of social media has ushered in a post-truth world: Twitter rumours and
unverifiable videos abound, and TV news seeks to entertain
rather than inform. In this compelling account, one of the
outstanding journalists of our time provides a moving, personal account of war and issues, and an impassioned call to put the substance back in our news.