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The history thieves : secrets, lies and the shaping of a modern nation / Ian Cobain.

By: Cobain, Ian, 1960-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: London, England : Portobello Books, 2017Copyright date: ©2016Description: 342 pages ; 20 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781846275852 (pbk.); 1846275857 (pbk.).Subject(s): Official secrets -- Great Britain -- History -- 20th century | Official secrets -- Great Britain -- History -- 21st century | Official secrets -- Great Britain | Government accountability -- Great Britain | Great Britain -- Politics and government -- 1945-DDC classification: 323.4450941 Summary: In 1889, the first Official Secrets Act was passed, creating offences of 'disclosure of information' and 'breach of official trust'. It limited and monitored what the public could, and should, be told. Since then a culture of secrecy has flourished. As successive governments have been selective about what they choose to share with the public, we have been left with a distorted and incomplete understanding not only of the workings of the state but of our nation's culture and its past.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due
Non-Fiction Gonville Library
Non-Fiction
Non-Fiction 323.445 COB Checked out 07/03/2020

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

A revelatory book exposing the culture of concealment at the heart of the British government, from the award-winning author of Cruel Britannia .

Originally published: 2016.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

In 1889, the first Official Secrets Act was passed, creating offences of 'disclosure of information' and 'breach of official trust'. It limited and monitored what the public could, and should, be told. Since then a culture of secrecy has flourished. As
successive governments have been selective about what they
choose to share with the public, we have been left with a
distorted and incomplete understanding not only of the workings of the state but of our nation's culture and its past.