Whanganuilibrary.com
Normal view MARC view ISBD view

'Paddy' Finucane and the legend of the Kenley Wing : No. 452 (Australian) Squadron, 485 (New Zealand) Squadron and 602 (City of Glasgow) Squadron with the Kenley Wing, 1941 / Anthony Cooper.

By: Cooper, Anthony James, 1961- [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: [Stroud] : Fonthill, 2016Copyright date: ©2016Description: 256 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm.Content type: text | still image | cartographic image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781781555125; 1781555125.Subject(s): Finucane, Paddy, 1920- | Great Britain. Royal Air Force. Kenley Wing -- History | Australia. Royal Australian Air Force. Squadron, 452 (1941-1945) -- History | New Zealand. Royal New Zealand Air Force. Squadron, no. 485 -- History | Great Britain. Royal Auxiliary Air Force. Squadron, 602 -- History | World War, 1939-1945 -- Aerial operations, British | R.A.F. Kenley (England) -- History -- 20th centuryDDC classification: 940.544 Summary: "A year after the start of the Battle of Britain, from the late summer of 1941 the Kenley Wing was one of the six Allied fighter wings taking the war to the Luftwaffe in the RAF s cross-channel air offensive over France. Comprised of three Spitfire fighter squadrons, the Australian No.452, the New Zealand No.485, and the British No.602, the Kenley Wing was typical of the wartime RAF in its cosmopolitan makeup, with pilots from all three countries as well as Ireland and Canada. The wing s famous ace pilots in 1941 included the Irishman, Paddy Finucane, the Canadian, Johnny Kent, the Australian, Bluey Truscott, and the New Zealanders, Al Deere and Hawkeye Wells. The most famous of them all was the charismatic Paddy Finucane, a flight commander with 452 (Australian) Squadron, who dominated the wing s scoring to become far and away its greatest star, and for a time the RAF s greatest public relations asset, stepping into the gap left by the loss into German captivity of Douglas Bader. This book tells the story of how Finucane s victories created the legend of the Kenley Wing in 1941."--Wheelers.co.nz
List(s) this item appears in: WW1 & WW2
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due
Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Non-Fiction
Non-Fiction 940.544 COO 1 Checked out 25/08/2020

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

A year after the start of the Battle of Britain, from the late summer of 1941 the Kenley Wing was one of the six Allied fighter wings taking the war to the Luftwaffe in the RAF's cross-channel air offensive over France.

Comprised of three Spitfire fighter squadrons, the Australian No.452, the New Zealand No.485, and the British No.602, the Kenley Wing was typical of the wartime RAF in its cosmopolitan makeup, with pilots from all three countries as well as Ireland and Canada. The wing's famous ace pilots in 1941 included the Irishman, 'Paddy Finucane', the Canadian, Johnny Kent, the Australian, 'Bluey' Truscott, and the New Zealanders, Al Deere and 'Hawkeye' Wells. The most famous of them all was the charismatic Paddy Finucane, a flight commander with 452 (Australian) Squadron, who dominated the wing's scoring to become far and away its greatest star, and for a time the RAF's greatest public relations asset, stepping into the gap left by the loss into German captivity of Douglas Bader. This book tells the story of how Finucane's victories created the legend of the Kenley Wing in 1941.

Includes bibliography (pages [251]-256).

"A year after the start of the Battle of Britain, from the late summer of 1941 the Kenley Wing was one of the six Allied fighter wings taking the war to the Luftwaffe in the RAF s cross-channel air offensive over France. Comprised of three Spitfire fighter squadrons, the Australian No.452, the New Zealand No.485, and the British No.602, the Kenley Wing was typical of the wartime RAF in its cosmopolitan makeup, with pilots from all three countries as well as Ireland and Canada. The wing s famous ace pilots in 1941 included the Irishman, Paddy Finucane, the Canadian, Johnny Kent, the Australian, Bluey Truscott, and the New Zealanders, Al Deere and Hawkeye Wells. The most famous of them all was the charismatic Paddy Finucane, a flight commander with 452 (Australian) Squadron, who dominated the wing s scoring to become far and away its greatest star, and for a time the RAF s greatest public relations asset, stepping into the gap left by the loss into German captivity of Douglas Bader. This book tells the story of how Finucane s victories created the legend of the Kenley Wing in 1941."--Wheelers.co.nz

15 27 37 77 115

NEWBKS-NP1

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Foreword (p. 5)
  • Introduction (p. 11)
  • 1 A Busy Day over the Channel (p. 15)
  • 2 The Empire Alone? (p. 27)
  • 3 Kenley's Kiwis and Brits (p. 42)
  • 4 Finucane and the Australians (p. 77)
  • 5 August 1941: The Legend Created (p. 95)
  • 6 September 1941: The Legend Established (p. 140)
  • 7 Internal Tensions (p. 172)
  • 8 The End of the 'Shooting Season' (p. 185)
  • Epilogue (p. 205)
  • Endnotes (p. 224)
  • Bibliography (p. 251)