Whanganuilibrary.com
Normal view MARC view ISBD view

The Midnight Gang / David Walliams ; illustrated by Tony Ross.

By: Walliams, David, 1971- [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: London : HarperCollins Children's Books, 2016Copyright date: ©2016Description: 476 pages : illustrations (black and white) ; 20 cm.Content type: text | still image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780008188573 (paperback); 0008188572 (paperback); 9780008164614 (hardback); 0008164614 (hardback).Subject(s): Hospital wards -- Juvenile fiction | Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction | Sick children -- Juvenile fiction | Nurses -- Juvenile fiction | Hospitals -- Employees -- Juvenile fiction | Medical fiction | Children's storiesDDC classification: 823.92 Summary: Welcome to the Midnight Gang! Midnight is the time when all children are fast asleep, except of course for...the Midnight Gang. That is when their adventures are just beginning...When Tom gets hit on the head by a cricket ball, he finds himself at Lord Funt Hospital, and is greeted by a terrifying-looking porter. Things go from bad to worse when he meets the wicked matron in charge of the children's ward... But Tom is about to embark on the most thrilling journey of a lifetime! The Midnight Gang tells an extraordinarily heartwarming and, of course, funny story of five children on a hospital ward - and on a quest for adventure! It is a story of friendship and magic - and of making dreams come true. Readers are set to be utterly spellbound by this heartfelt story that will bring magic to everyone's Christmas.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due
Childrens Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Children's Fiction
Children's Fiction WALL 1 Checked out 18/07/2020
Childrens Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Children's Fiction
Children's Fiction WALL 2 Checked out 26/07/2020

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Welcome to the Midnight Gang! Midnight is the time when all children are fast asleep, except of course for... the Midnight Gang. That is when their adventures are just beginning...

When Tom gets hit on the head by a cricket ball, he finds himself at Lord Funt Hospital, and is greeted by a terrifying-looking porter. Things go from bad to worse when he meets the wicked matron in charge of the children's ward... But Tom is about to embark on the most thrilling journey of a lifetime!

The Midnight Gang tells an extraordinarily heartwarming and, of course, funny story of five children on a hospital ward - and on a quest for adventure! It is a story of friendship and magic - and of making dreams come true. Readers are set to be utterly spellbound by this heartfelt story that will bring magic to everyone.

Welcome to the Midnight Gang! Midnight is the time when all children are fast asleep, except of course for...the Midnight Gang. That is when their adventures are just beginning...When Tom gets hit on the head by a cricket ball, he finds himself at Lord Funt Hospital, and is greeted by a terrifying-looking porter. Things go from bad to worse when he meets the wicked matron in charge of the children's ward... But Tom is about to embark on the most thrilling journey of a lifetime! The Midnight Gang tells an extraordinarily heartwarming and, of course, funny story of five children on a hospital ward - and on a quest for adventure! It is a story of friendship and magic - and of making dreams come true. Readers are set to be utterly spellbound by this heartfelt story that will bring magic to everyone's Christmas.

HU_HUCOLL, HU_NEWCHIL, NP-KIDSNEW, UH-JUNFIC

2 5 6 8 11 18 19 20 27 28 30 32 33 34 37 38 39 44 46 49 62 66 68 70 79 80 81 82 83 85 91 92 94 96 97 98 100 102 103 104 105 109 110 111 114 115 119 120 122 123 124 125 127 128 129 130 132 133 134 135 138 141 142 144 147 149 151 159 161 164 171 175 177 189 190

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

Gr 3-6-The Lord Funt Hospital in London is a rambling building with a rather odd staff. Twelve-year-old Tom Charper finds this out when the admitting doctor poses 192 questions before treating Tom's bump on the head. Tom soon joins the Children's Ward on the 44th floor where he meets Amber, Robin, George, and Sally. The children-except for Sally who is gravely ill-escape the horrible Matron each night at midnight. The children pretend to visit the North Pole, fly, and enact other grandiose plans with the help of the caring porter. Tom's desire to participate disrupts his friendship with Sally who asks Tom to include her. The Midnight Gang's final dream is tragic and boisterously youthful. Ross's numerous black-and-white illustrations mirror Walliams's lawless, uncontained revelry. The author creates a surreal world in which adults are remote and children set the stage with their wildest imaginings. The giant hospital makes for a contained yet boundless setting where children find the supplies to fuel their dreams. Take-charge Amber directs events from her wheelchair and conniving George uses drugged sweets on the Matron. The dark cloud of Sally's prognosis cannot be ignored, yet Walliams portrays it as one element in the glorious fabric of childhood. VERDICT Irreverent as Roald Dahl, Walliams is a unique author who's created a memorable world and cast of characters.-Caitlin Augusta, Stratford Library Association, CT © Copyright 2017. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Booklist Review

Having taken aim at dentists in Demon Dentist (2016) and senior care in Grandpa's Great Escape (2017), Walliams turns to the medical professions with this satirical tale of children's-ward patients who sneak out at night to fulfill one another's wishes. Sometimes the efforts of the titular gang take unexpected twists, as when the hundreds of balloons harvested from all over shabby Lord Funt Hospital to give chubby young George a taste of weightless flight are hijacked by a senile nonagenarian who soars gaily away over London. Other exploits go better, particularly the sweet pageant climactically staged around the bed of desperately ill Sally (the author leaves her disease unspecified, but it looks a lot like cancer) in response to her wish for a big, beautiful life! Readers who prefer their humor on the offensive side will enjoy the way the author needles authority figures by casting them as stupid, malicious, or both. Also Roald Dahl-like, the narrative is embroidered with typographical flights and, from Ross, comical ink-and-wash caricatures.--Peters, John Copyright 2018 Booklist

Horn Book Review

Walliams channels Roald Dahl's irreverent, authority-bashing humor in this energetic fantasy in which rebellious children escape their London hospital ward to act out their wildest dreams. Ross's line drawings and the use of varied fonts enliven the proceedings. Verisimilitude is hardly the point here, nor is depth of characterization: the silliness is its own raison d'jtre. (c) Copyright 2019. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Kirkus Book Review

Plucky, sometimes-mean children come together to defeat diabolical hospital administrators and evil headmasters.When Tom gets hit on the head with a cricket ball, he is sent to a horrible hospital, with clueless doctors, a horrid matron, and a porter with "the most monstrous face he had ever seen." In the middle of the night, Tom follows the secretive children in his ward and discovers the Midnight Gang, the mysterious society of child patients who have nighttime adventures. With the porter's help, the children, all apparently white, create a North Pole adventure and a whiz-bang balloon journey. The excited prose, supplemented by a variety of typefaces and Ross' not-quite-Quentin Blake illustrations, describes disgusting school dinners of "deep-fried otter" and adults who revel in "a touch of cruelty." Despite clear Roald Dahl parallels, Walliams' nastiness and yuck aren't accompanied by Dahl's charm or wicked wit. The humor is found in "plump-looking" George's candy eating, Robin's and Amber's disabilities, andunexpected from the author of The Boy in the Dress (2009)Matron's cruel insistence on dressing Tom in a pink frilly nightdress. An eventual lesson about bigotry against ugly people is undercut by prose that delights in describing the porter as "pongy" and having "rotten and misshapen teeth."An entertaining tale that will definitely find an audience, but fans of icky, vicious comedy deserve better. (Fiction. 9-11) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.