Whanganuilibrary.com
Normal view MARC view ISBD view

The sewing circles of Herat : my Afghan years / Christina Lamb.

By: Lamb, Christina.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: London : HarperCollins, 2002Description: xvii, 338 pages, [8] pages of plates : illustrations ; 24cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 000714251X :; 0007157886 (pbk.).Subject(s): Lamb, Christina -- Travel -- Afghanistan | Lamb, Christina | Lamb, Christina -- Travel -- Afghanistan | War and society -- Afghanistan | Women journalists -- Afghanistan -- Biography | Afghanistan -- History | Afghanistan -- Description and travel -- 2001- | Afghanistan -- Social conditions -- 20th century | Afghanistan -- Description and travel | Afghanistan -- History -- 20th century | Afghanistan -- Politics and government | Afghanistan -- Social conditions | Afghanistan -- Social conditions -- 20th centuryDDC classification: 958.1046
Contents:
Beginnings -- The Taliban Torturer -- Mullahs on Motorbikes -- Inside the House of Knowledge -- The Royal Court in Exile -- The Sewing Circles of Herat -- The Secret of Glass -- Unpainting the Peacocks -- The Story of Abdullah -- Face to Face with the Taliban -- A Letter from Kabul.
Includes bibliographical references (p. [327]-328) and index. -A moving narrative of one women's journey back to Afghanistan to report on the plight of its people.
Review: "A gold-inscribed invitation to a wedding in a foreign land led Christina Lamb to abandon suburban England for the wilds of Peshawar on the frontier of the Afghan war. She found herself drawn into the lives of the people who smuggled her into their country to cover the final stages of the mujaheddin victory over the Soviet army." "Among them was Hamid Karzai, now President of Afghanistan, who took her to his homeland of Kandahar where they went on daring raids with a group of motorcycling mullahs who later became founder-members of the Taliban." "Long haunted by her experiences of war in Afghanistan, Lamb returned there after last year's attack on the World Trade Centre to discover what had become of the people who had marked her life as a young graduate, and how their land came to be used as a base for the most evil terrorist operation the world has ever seen." "This time seeing the land through the eyes of a mother and experienced foreign correspondent, Lamb weaves together a compelling narrative of her voyage amid the abandoned victims of almost a quarter century of war."--BOOK JACKET.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due
Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Non-Fiction
Non-Fiction 958.1046 LAM 1 Checked out 11/08/2020

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Ten years ago, Christina Lamb reported on the war the Afghan people were fighting against the Soviet Union. Now, back in Afghanistan, she has written an extraordinary memoir of her love affair with the country and its people.

A gold-inscribed invitation to a wedding in Pakistan led Christina Lamb to leave suburban England for Peshawar - a town perched on the frontier of the Afghan war - at the age of just 21. Captivated by the Afghans she met, for two years she tracked the final stages of the mujaheddin victory over the Soviets as Afghan friends smuggled her in and out of their country in a variety of guises - from burqa-clad wife to Kandahari boy - travelling by foot, on donkeys, or hidden under the floor of an ambulance.

Long haunted by her experiences in Afghanistan, Lamb returned there after last year's attack on the World Trade Centre to find out what had become of the people and places that had marked her life as a young graduate.This time seeing the land through the eyes of a mother and experienced foreign correspondent, Lamb's journey brings her in touch with the people no one else is writing about: the abandoned victims of almost a quarter century of war.

Among them are the brave women writers of Herat who carried on the literary tradition of this ancient Persian city under the guise of sewing circles; those persecuted by the Taliban such as Kabul's leading kite-maker, imprisoned for making the colourful paper kites that fly from the rooftops of the city; and Khalil Ahmed Hassani, a former Taliban torturer who admits to breaking the spines of men, then making them stand on their heads.

Christina Lamb's reputation as a skilful chronicler of human stories, her unique perspective on Afghanistan, and her deep passion for the people she writes about make this the definitive account of the extraordinarily tragic plight of a proud people.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Beginnings -- The Taliban Torturer -- Mullahs on Motorbikes -- Inside the House of Knowledge -- The Royal Court in Exile -- The Sewing Circles of Herat -- The Secret of Glass -- Unpainting the Peacocks -- The Story of Abdullah -- Face to Face with the Taliban -- A Letter from Kabul.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [327]-328) and index. -A moving narrative of one women's journey back to Afghanistan to report on the plight of its people.

"A gold-inscribed invitation to a wedding in a foreign land led Christina Lamb to abandon suburban England for the wilds of Peshawar on the frontier of the Afghan war. She found herself drawn into the lives of the people who smuggled her into their country to cover the final stages of the mujaheddin victory over the Soviet army." "Among them was Hamid Karzai, now President of Afghanistan, who took her to his homeland of Kandahar where they went on daring raids with a group of motorcycling mullahs who later became founder-members of the Taliban." "Long haunted by her experiences of war in Afghanistan, Lamb returned there after last year's attack on the World Trade Centre to discover what had become of the people who had marked her life as a young graduate, and how their land came to be used as a base for the most evil terrorist operation the world has ever seen." "This time seeing the land through the eyes of a mother and experienced foreign correspondent, Lamb weaves together a compelling narrative of her voyage amid the abandoned victims of almost a quarter century of war."--BOOK JACKET.

11 18 20 60 61 74 80 81 93 177