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Silver : the spy who fooled the Nazis : the most remarkable agent of the Second World War / Mihir Bose.

By: Bose, Mihir, 1947- [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Stroud : Fonthill Media Limited, 2016Description: 1 volume : illustrations (black and white), maps (black and white).Content type: text | still image | cartographic image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781781553718.Subject(s): Talwar, Bhagat Ram | World War, 1939-1945 -- Secret service | Espionage -- Europe -- History -- 20th centuryDDC classification: 940.5485092 Summary: Silver was the codename for the only quintuple spy of the Second World War, spying for the Italians, Germans, Japanese, Soviets and the British. The Germans awarded him the Iron Cross, Germany's highest military decoration, and paid him £2.5 million in today's money. In reality Silver deceived the Nazis on behalf of the Soviets and the British. In 1942 the Russians decided to share Silver with the British, the only time during the war that the Soviets agreed to such an arrangement. This brought him under the control of Peter Fleming who acted as his spy master. Germans also gave Silver a transmitter which broadcast misleading military information directly to Abwehr headquarters in Berlin. Silver was one of many codenames for a man whose real name was Bhagat Ram Talwar, a Hindu Pathan from the North West Frontier province of then British India. Between 1941 and 1945 Silver made twelve trips from Peshawar to Kabul to supply false information to the Germans, always making the near-200-mile journey on foot over mountain passes and hostile tribal territory. Once when an Afghan nearly rumbled him, he invited him to a curry meal in which he had mixed deadly tiger's whiskers killing the Afghan.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Silver was the codename for the only quintuple spy of the Second World War, spying for the Italians, Germans, Japanese, Soviets and the British. The Germans awarded him the Iron Cross, Germany's highest military decoration, and paid him £2.5 million in today's money. In reality Silver deceived the Nazis on behalf of the Soviets and the British. In 1942 the Russians decided to share Silver with the British, the only time during the war that the Soviets agreed to such an arrangement. This brought him under the control of Peter Fleming who acted as his spy master. Germans also gave Silver a transmitter which broadcast misleading military information directly to Abwehr headquarters in Berlin. Silver was one of many codenames for a man whose real name was Bhagat Ram Talwar, a Hindu Pathan from the North West Frontier province of then British India. Between 1941 and 1945 Silver made twelve trips from Peshawar to Kabul to supply false information to the Germans, always making the near-200-mile journey on foot over mountain passes and hostile tribal territory. Once when an Afghan nearly rumbled him, he invited him to a curry meal in which he had mixed deadly tiger's whiskers killing the Afghan.

Silver was the codename for the only quintuple spy of the Second World War, spying for the Italians, Germans, Japanese, Soviets and the British. The Germans awarded him the Iron Cross, Germany's highest military decoration, and paid him £2.5 million in today's money. In reality Silver deceived the Nazis on behalf of the Soviets and the British. In 1942 the Russians decided to share Silver with the British, the only time during the war that the Soviets agreed to such an arrangement. This brought him under the control of Peter Fleming who acted as his spy master. Germans also gave Silver a transmitter which broadcast misleading military information directly to Abwehr headquarters in Berlin. Silver was one of many codenames for a man whose real name was Bhagat Ram Talwar, a Hindu Pathan from the North West Frontier province of then British India. Between 1941 and 1945 Silver made twelve trips from Peshawar to Kabul to supply false information to the Germans, always making the near-200-mile journey on foot over mountain passes and hostile tribal territory. Once when an Afghan nearly rumbled him, he invited him to a curry meal in which he had mixed deadly tiger's whiskers killing the Afghan.

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NE-ONORDER, TI-NONFICT

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Preface (p. 7)
  • Introduction-From Cook to Spy (p. 13)
  • 1 The Remarkable Pathan (p. 27)
  • 2 A Rebel is Born (p. 44)
  • 3 Learning Politics from a Bullock (p. 57)
  • 4 The Stagehand Becomes the Main Actor (p. 63)
  • 5 Searching the Road to Kabul (p. 75)
  • 6 Seeking Stalin Finding Hitler (p. 89)
  • 7 The Italian Job (p. 101)
  • 8 Hitler, the Faqir and the Nazi Intrigues (p. 114)
  • 9 The Phantom Italian Spy (p. 127)
  • 10 Moscow Calling (p. 140)
  • 11 Taking the Nazis for a Ride (p. 153)
  • 12 More Nazi Loot in Kabul (p. 165)
  • 13 Russia's Gift to Britain (p. 179)
  • 14 Silver's Moscow Centre (p. 200)
  • 15 Britain's Man (p. 206)
  • 16 A Very Special Sahib (p. 217)
  • 17 The Problem with Mary and Oliver (p. 226)
  • 18 Silver and the new Great Game (p. 240)
  • 19 Now We Have Five (p. 257)
  • 20 Back to the Beginning (p. 276)
  • Epilogue-The Unsolved Mystery (p. 295)
  • Appendices:
  • 1 Chronology (p. 305)
  • 2 Money given to Silver by the Axis powers (p. 319)
  • 3 British Guide to Good Mullahs (p. 321)
  • 4 Main Characters (p. 323)
  • 5 Codes used in the Silver Operation by the British (p. 329)
  • Endnotes (p. 331)
  • Bibliography (p. 344)