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Women heroes of World War II : the Pacific Theater : 15 stories of resistance, rescue, sabotage, and survival / Kathryn J. Atwood.

By: Atwood, Kathryn J [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Chicago, Illinois : Chicago Review Press Incorporated, [2016]Copyright date: ©2016Description: xix, 235 pages : illustrations, map ; 23 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781613731680; 161373168X.Other title: Women heroes of World War 2 | Women heroes of World War two.Subject(s): World War, 1939-1945 -- Women -- Biography | World War, 1939-1945 -- Participation, Female | World War, 1939-1945 -- Pacific Area | World War, 1939-1945 -- Underground movementsDDC classification: 940.53092/525
Contents:
China -- Peggy Hull: in a war zone -- Minnie Vautrin: American hero at the Nanking Massacre -- Gladys Aylward: "All China is a battlefield" -- The United States and the Philippines -- Elizabeth MacDonald: Pearl Harbor reporter and OSS agent -- Denny Williams: Nurse under fire -- Margaret Utinsky: The Miss U network -- Yay Panlilio: Guerilla writer -- Claire Phillips: Spy singer -- Maria Rosa Henson: Guerilla courier and "comfort woman" -- Mayala, Singapore, and the Dutch East Indies -- Sybil Kathigasu: "This was war" -- Elizabeth Choy: "Justice will triumph" -- Vivian Bullwinkel: Sole survivor -- Helen Coljin: Rising above -- Iwo Jima and Okinawa -- Jane Kendeign: Flight nurse -- Dickey Chapelle: "As far forward as you'll let me."
Summary: Women Heroes of World War I brings to life the brave exploits of 16 women from around the world who served their countries at a time when most women didn t even have the right to vote.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due
Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Non-Fiction
Non-Fiction 940.5308 ATW 1 Checked out 21/11/2020

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

A Notable Social Studies Trade Book for Young People 2017 Glamorous American singer Claire Phillips opened a nightclub in manila, using the earnings to secretly feed starving American POWs. She also began working as a spy, chatting up Japanese military men and passing their secrets along to local guerrilla resistance fighters. Australian Army nurse Vivian Bullwinkel, stationed in Singapore, then shipwrecked in the the Dutch East Indies, became the sole survivor of a horrible massacre by Japanese soliders. She hid for days, tending to a seriously wounded British soldier while wounded herself. Humanitarian Elizabeth Choy lived the rest of her life hating war, though not her tormentors, after enduring six months of starvation and torture by the Japanese military police. In these pages, readers will meet these and other courageous women and girls who risked their lives through their involvement in the Pacific Theater of Operations during World War II. Fifteen suspense-filled stories unfold across China, Japan, Malaya, Singapore, the Dutch East Indies, and the Philippines, providing an inspiring reminder of womens' and girls' refusal to sit on the sidelines around the world and throughout history. These women--whose stories span 1932 to 1945, the last year of the war--served in dangerous roles as spies, medics, journalists, resisters, and saboteurs. Seven of them were captured and imprisoned by the Japanese, enduring brutal conditions. Author Kathryn J. Atwood provides appropriate context and framing for teens 14 and up to grapple with these harsh realities of war. Discussion questions and a guide for further study assist readers and educators in learning about this important and often neglected period of history.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

China -- Peggy Hull: in a war zone -- Minnie Vautrin: American hero at the Nanking Massacre -- Gladys Aylward: "All China is a battlefield" -- The United States and the Philippines -- Elizabeth MacDonald: Pearl Harbor reporter and OSS agent -- Denny Williams: Nurse under fire -- Margaret Utinsky: The Miss U network -- Yay Panlilio: Guerilla writer -- Claire Phillips: Spy singer -- Maria Rosa Henson: Guerilla courier and "comfort woman" -- Mayala, Singapore, and the Dutch East Indies -- Sybil Kathigasu: "This was war" -- Elizabeth Choy: "Justice will triumph" -- Vivian Bullwinkel: Sole survivor -- Helen Coljin: Rising above -- Iwo Jima and Okinawa -- Jane Kendeign: Flight nurse -- Dickey Chapelle: "As far forward as you'll let me."

Women Heroes of World War I brings to life the brave exploits of 16 women from around the world who served their countries at a time when most women didn t even have the right to vote.

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Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Author's Note (p. vii)
  • Map: The Far East and the Pacific, August 1942 (p. viii)
  • Introduction (p. xi)
  • Part I China
  • 1 In a War Zone (p. 3)
  • 2 American Hero at the Nanking Massacre (p. 13)
  • 3 "All China Is a Battlefield" (p. 25)
  • Part II The United States and the Philippines
  • 4 Pearl Harbor Reporter and OSS Agent (p. 39)
  • 5 American Nurse Under Fire (p. 52)
  • 6 The Miss U Network (p. 65)
  • 7 Guerrilla Writer (p. 75)
  • 8 Manila Agent (p. 88)
  • 9 Guerrilla Courier and Rape Survivor (p. 99)
  • Part III Malaya, Singapore, and the Dutch East Indies
  • 10 "This Was War" (p. 113)
  • 11 "Justice Will Triumph" (p. 123)
  • 12 Sole Survivor (p. 134)
  • 13 Rising Above (p. 145)
  • Part IV Iwo Jima and Okinawa
  • 14 Navy Flight Nurse (p. 159)
  • 15 "As Far Forward as You'll Let Me" (p. 169)
  • Epilogue (p. 185)
  • Acknowledgments (p. 201)
  • Discussion Questions and Suggestions for Further Study (p. 203)
  • Notes (p. 211)
  • Bibliography (p. 223)
  • Index (p. 229)

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

Gr 7 Up-Atwood continues her examination of women heroes of World War II, this time focusing on events in the Pacific theater. She features American, Australian, British, Dutch, and Filipino women in the Philippines, Singapore, China, Malaysia, and even the United States. This diverse group is comprised of nurses, humanitarians, spies, and war correspondents. Among those highlighted are Gladys Aylward, the British missionary in China who escorted 200 children on a trek to flee the Japanese army; Denny Williams, an American nurse on Corregidor who wound up a prisoner; humanitarian Elizabeth Choy of Borneo, who was tortured for providing food and medical assistance; Maria Rosa Henson, who gave information to guerrillas in the Philippines and endured rape and beatings; and Dickey Chapelle, a U.S. war correspondent who took photos at Iwo Jima and Okinawa. Atwood presents their stories with dignity and admiration. She is forthright about her subjects' suffering, and though she spares readers overly graphic descriptions, some may find parts of the content difficult to read. Each chapter ends with a brief look at the heroine's life after the war. Sidebars and black-and-white photographs are included along with a conclusion about the ending of the war with Japan. VERDICT A suitable addition to works on World War II and a fine follow-up to Atwood's Women Heroes of World War II: 26 Stories of Espionage, Sabotage, Resistance, and Rescue.-Margaret Nunes, Gwinnett County Public Library, GA © Copyright 2016. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Booklist Review

*Starred Review* These brief accounts of women who rose to the challenges posed by Japan's expansionist aggression culminating in WWII abound with facts and dates. Details duly mustered, this follow-up to Atwood's Women Heroes of World War II (2011) is part helpful informational text, part enthralling narrative. Each of these 15 profiles could constitute a cliff-hanger screenplay, and several have indeed generated films some disowned by their modest subjects as romanticized. To a woman, these health workers, journalists, and ingenious spies tended to downplay their heroism, exhibiting a phenomenal selflessness. Malayan nurse Sybil Kathigasu, for instance, risked her life and that of her family to tend to wounded guerrillas in secret. Her decision to do so all but ensured prison and torture, but she held fast to a bigger picture: If we die to win the freedom that others may enjoy, there is comfort in that. The fervor of the women whose stories are on display here seems to have arisen not so much from partisanship as from a shared bent: a deep, essential humanitarianism. Here the drama, much of it horrifying, plays out so effectively on the page it leaps out like vivid 3-D that readers of any age will come away both shaken and inspired.--MacDonald, Sandy Copyright 2016 Booklist

Horn Book Review

These are interesting collective biographies of women on the WWII Pacific front and from both sides of the American Civil War, who challenged gender stereotypes of their time. Clear narrative texts provide ample historical context along with supplemental sections and high-quality black-and-white photographs. The informative accounts include plenty of primary sources and suggested further reading for each chapter. Bib., ind. [Review covers these Women of Action titles: Women Heroes of World War II and Courageous Women of the Civil War.] (c) Copyright 2017. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Kirkus Book Review

What is the true nature of heroism? Atwood (Women Heroes of World War II, 2011, etc.) offers a quote from George F. Kennan in an epigraph to this engrossing history of heroic women: Heroism is endurance for one moment more. Fifteen biographies of women with roles in the Pacific theater of World War II follow. The women, both white and Asian (non-Japanese), came from a variety of countries and include nurses, spies, missionaries, journalists, and a brutalized sex slave for Japanese soldiers. Many endured inhuman mistreatment at the hands of Japanese military. Although the biographies are brief, they effectively convey the devastating effects of the war and offer graphic information about casualties. An epilogue clearly explains both the international situation in the summer of 1945 and the Japanese military stance that led up to the American decision to use atomic bombs to end the war in the Pacific. Photographs with useful captions and occasional well-placed text boxes offer additional information. Detailed endnotes, a lengthy bibliography, and suggested discussion questions round out the presentation. Only one of the admirable women, Elizabeth MacDonald, who served mostly in Washington, D.C., in the Office of Strategic Services (after beginning the war near Pearl Harbor), seems to fail to fully exemplify Kennans definition. Japanese women who demonstrated heroism are notably absent from this Allied-leaning overview. A worthy addition to military collections. (index, not seen) (Nonfiction. 12-18) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.