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Dandelion & quince : exploring the wide world of unusual vegetables, fruits, and herbs / Michelle McKenzie ; photographs by Rick Poon.

By: McKenzie, Michelle [author.].
Contributor(s): Poon, Rick [photographer.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Boulder : Roost Books, 2016Copyright date: ©2016Edition: First edition.Description: xx, 311 pages : color illustrations ; 27 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781611802870; 1611802873.Other title: Dandelion and quince.Subject(s): Cooking (Wild foods) | Wild plants, EdibleGenre/Form: Cookbooks.DDC classification: 641.3/03
Contents:
Asian pear -- Bolting herbs -- Buddha's hand -- Burdock -- Cardoons -- Celeriac -- Celery leaves -- Daikon -- Dandelion -- Dates -- Edible ornamentals -- Fava leaves -- Fennel fronds, flowers, pollen -- Fig leaves -- Gooseberries and ground cherries -- Green garlic -- Horseradish -- Huckleberries -- Kohlrabi -- Kumquats -- Mustard greens -- Nettles -- Persimmons -- Pomegranate -- Purslane -- Quince -- Radicchio -- Ramps -- Roses -- Rutabaga -- Saltwater plants -- Shallot -- Sorrel -- Sprouts -- Squash blossom -- Sunchokes -- Tomatillos -- Weeds we want -- Pantry essentials -- In my larder.
Summary: "Dandelion & Quince features plant profiles for over 35 uncommon vegetables, fruits, and herbs available in today's markets--with over 150 recipes that explore their flavors. This illustrated cookbook celebrates the abundance at farmers' market and local grocery store yet to be discovered by the everyday cook. From mustard and kumquats to nettles, fava leaves, sunchokes and more, the blossoms, berries, leaves, and roots featured in Dandelion & Quince are simple foods that satisfy our need for a diversity of plant life in our diets, grown with care and prepared by our own hands for our families and communities. This book: Explores more than thirty-five uncommon vegetables, fruits, and herbs. Offers over 150 recipes to satisfy curious palates. Provides enough guidance, tips, and advice that by following recipes, tasting constantly, and making mistakes, you'll gain newly skilled hands and a knowing palate. Discover new ingredients and open up a fresh culinary adventure in your kitchen.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due
Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Non-Fiction
Non-Fiction 641.65 MCK 1 Available

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Dandelion and Quince is an illustrated cookbook that celebrates the less familiar and more unique produce available to all of us. There is so much at the farmers' market and local grocery store yet to be discovered by the everyday cook- mustard, kumquats, spigarello, nettles, fava leaves, sunchokes. Professional chefs have embraced these blossoms, berries, leaves, and roots, and we-their approving patrons with our increasingly curious palates-are ready to prepare them in our own homes. Whereas arugula and kale once seemed exotic, now they're as everyday as peas and potatoes. The same can be true for the ingredients in this book. They belong in our home kitchens. These are simple foods that satisfy our need for a diversity of plant life in our diets, grown with care and prepared by our own hands for our families and communities. Through 150 simple but distinct recipes, Michelle encourages each of us to learn from her recipes so that we can find our own compass in the kitchen. By following recipes, tasting constantly, and making mistakes, the reader will be able to eventually close this book and approach an unknown vegetable with newly skilled hands and a knowing palate.

Includes index.

Asian pear -- Bolting herbs -- Buddha's hand -- Burdock -- Cardoons -- Celeriac -- Celery leaves -- Daikon -- Dandelion -- Dates -- Edible ornamentals -- Fava leaves -- Fennel fronds, flowers, pollen -- Fig leaves -- Gooseberries and ground cherries -- Green garlic -- Horseradish -- Huckleberries -- Kohlrabi -- Kumquats -- Mustard greens -- Nettles -- Persimmons -- Pomegranate -- Purslane -- Quince -- Radicchio -- Ramps -- Roses -- Rutabaga -- Saltwater plants -- Shallot -- Sorrel -- Sprouts -- Squash blossom -- Sunchokes -- Tomatillos -- Weeds we want -- Pantry essentials -- In my larder.

"Dandelion & Quince features plant profiles for over 35 uncommon vegetables, fruits, and herbs available in today's markets--with over 150 recipes that explore their flavors. This illustrated cookbook celebrates the abundance at farmers' market and local grocery store yet to be discovered by the everyday cook. From mustard and kumquats to nettles, fava leaves, sunchokes and more, the blossoms, berries, leaves, and roots featured in Dandelion & Quince are simple foods that satisfy our need for a diversity of plant life in our diets, grown with care and prepared by our own hands for our families and communities. This book: Explores more than thirty-five uncommon vegetables, fruits, and herbs. Offers over 150 recipes to satisfy curious palates. Provides enough guidance, tips, and advice that by following recipes, tasting constantly, and making mistakes, you'll gain newly skilled hands and a knowing palate. Discover new ingredients and open up a fresh culinary adventure in your kitchen.

11 24 27 66 74 96 105 142

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Introduction (p. vii)
  • Asian Pears (p. 1)
  • Bolting Herbs (p. 9)
  • Buddha's Hand (p. 17)
  • Burdock (p. 27)
  • Cardoons (p. 35)
  • Celeriac (p. 41)
  • Celery Leaves (p. 47)
  • Daikon Radish (p. 55)
  • Dandelion (p. 63)
  • Dates (p. 71)
  • Edible Ornamentals (p. 79)
  • Fava Leaves (p. 85)
  • Fennel Fronds, Flowers, and Pollen (p. 93)
  • Fig Leaves (p. 99)
  • Gooseberries and Ground Cherries (p. 109)
  • Green Garlic (p. 115)
  • Horseradish (p. 123)
  • Huckleberries (p. 129)
  • Kohlrabi (p. 135)
  • Kumquats (p. 141)
  • Mustard Greens (p. 149)
  • Nettles (p. 157)
  • Persimmons (p. 165)
  • Pomegranates (p. 173)
  • Purslane (p. 183)
  • Quince (p. 191)
  • Radicchio (p. 199)
  • Ramps (p. 207)
  • Rose Petals (p. 213)
  • Shallots (p. 219)
  • Sorrel (p. 229)
  • Sprouts (p. 237)
  • Squash Blossoms (p. 249)
  • Sunchokes (p. 255)
  • Tomatillos (p. 263)
  • Weeds We Want (p. 271)
  • Pantry Essentials (p. 281)
  • In My Larder (p. 291)
  • Sources (p. 296)
  • Acknowledgments (p. 298)
  • Index (p. 299)

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

San Francisco-based chef and cooking instructor McKenzie here introduces cooking with Asian pears, celeriac, rose petals, sunchokes, and other overlooked plants. Each ingredient-based chapter comprises a descriptive "plant profile" and three to five simple yet memorable recipes for small plates, light meals, drinks, and desserts (e.g., pickled pears, hibiscus and lime iced tea, wild greens with summer melon and avocado). Part cookbook, part culinary reference, this sumptuously photographed book reflects the best qualities of wonderful titles such as Domenica Marchetti's The Glorious Vegetables of Italy, Cathy Thomas's 50 Best Plants on the Planet, Diane Morgan's Roots, and David Tanis's One Good Dish. VERDICT Home cooks with access to farmers markets and well-stocked grocery stores will relish McKenzie's recipes, which will tempt them to explore less-familiar ingredients. © Copyright 2016. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Publishers Weekly Review

McKenzie shares her experience working in several San Francisco farmers' markets in this encyclopedic collection of more than 150 suggested recipes for 35 different plants. Each profile begins with a short description of the plant, its common varietals, and its key characteristics before moving on to a handful of recipes featuring that fruit, vegetable, or herb. Readers will likely be struck by the number of plants they've seen in grocery stores or farmers' markets and wondered about, such as the citrusy Buddha's Hand and celeriac. They'll also find additional uses for parts that are often thrown away, such as roasted celery leaves, which can be used in lieu of bay leaves in soups and sauces, as dill blossoms that are used to add flavor to a smoked trout and potato hash. Those expecting arcane ingredients and hard-to-source dishes will be pleasantly surprised. Many of McKenzie's recipes are simple and practical, requiring little or no effort to put together: roasted broccoli with grated horseradish, dried persimmon tea, and mustard greens with potatoes and whole spices are well within the reach of all readers. Inventive, inspiring and informative, this is a key part of your next visit to the local farmers' market. (Aug.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.