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Home is burning / Dan Marshall.

By: Marshall, Dan (Daniel Joseph), 1982- [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookLondon Hodder & Stoughton, 2015 ©2015Description: 304 pages ; 22 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781473624290.Other title: Home is burning : a memoir.Subject(s): Marshall, Dan (Daniel Joseph), 1982- -- Family | Cancer -- Patients -- Family relationships | Cancer -- Patients -- United States -- Biography | Mothers and daughters -- United States | Mothers and sons -- United States | Fathers and daughters -- United States | Fathers and sons -- United StatesDDC classification: 362.19699/40092 Summary: At twenty-five, Dan left his 'spoiled white asshole' life in Los Angeles to look after his dying parents in Salt Lake City, Utah. His mother, who had already been battling cancer on and off for close to 15 years, had taken a turn for the worse. His father, a devoted marathon runner and adored parent, had been diagnosed with motor neurone disease which was quickly eroding his body. Dan's four siblings were already home, caring for their parents and resenting Dan for not doing the same. Home is Burning tells the story of Dan's year at home in Salt Lake City, as he reunites with his eclectic family -the only non-Mormon family of seven in the entire town- all of them trying their best to be there for the father who had always been there for them.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

'An incredibly personal story...sad, but unbelievably funny' - Claudia Winkleman, BBC Radio 2 Arts Show 'This memoir is gasp-out-loud, offensively funny, touching and a sure thing for anyone who likes David Sedaris - but with more Mormons' - Red At twenty-five, Dan left his 'spoiled white asshole' life in Los Angeles to look after his dying parents in Salt Lake City, Utah. His mother, who had already been battling cancer on and off for close to 15 years, had taken a turn for the worse. His father, a devoted marathon runner and adored parent, had been diagnosed with motor neurone disease which was quickly eroding his body. Dan's four siblings were already home, caring for their parents and resenting Dan for not doing the same. Home is Burning tells the story of Dan's year at home in Salt Lake City, as he reunites with his eclectic family -the only non-Mormon family of seven in the entire town- all of them trying their best to be there for the father who had always been there for them.

At twenty-five, Dan left his 'spoiled white asshole' life in Los Angeles to look after his dying parents in Salt Lake City, Utah. His mother, who had already been battling cancer on and off for close to 15 years, had taken a turn for the worse. His father, a devoted marathon runner and adored parent, had been diagnosed with motor neurone disease which was quickly eroding his body. Dan's four siblings were already home, caring for their parents and resenting Dan for not doing the same. Home is Burning tells the story of Dan's year at home in Salt Lake City, as he reunites with his eclectic family -the only non-Mormon family of seven in the entire town- all of them trying their best to be there for the father who had always been there for them.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

Publishers Weekly Review

In this impressive debut, Marshall relates the bleak reality of caring for his father after ALS-also known as Lou Gehrig's disease-began wreaking havoc on his body. The disease had a dramatic effect on the entire family, already reeling from their mother's ongoing battle with cancer. Memoirs about a family member who has contracted a terminal illness are almost tediously common, but most of them don't include jokes about oral sex or puns on the word "dystrophy." Fortunately for readers, Marshall's brain is wired for profanity, gallows humor, and graphic self-deprecation, and the rest of his family is not much different. Marshall evokes sympathy, but never pity, as he conveys his family's pain through fart jokes, farcical misadventures (sexual and medical), and-in the middle of all the confusion-emotion so raw and potent it's almost jarring. Honesty is the key; Marshall never shies away from the filthy, uncomfortable reality, and it's that brutal truth-telling that makes his memoir a must-read. (Oct.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Booklist Review

Recent grad Marshall leaves it all behind job, girlfriend, dream life in L.A. to return home to Utah to care for his parents. His mother has had cancer for 15 years, and it's back with a vengeance. Worse in some ways, his marathon-running, take-charge dad is rapidly disappearing into Lou Gehrig's disease. Despite the book's continual bad language and many morbid jokes, it's a weeper nearly from page 1. How could anyone handle the thought of losing both parents almost at once, especially when there are two teen sisters at home also needing help? Marshall and his other siblings shoulder it all by swearing, drinking, racing wheelchairs down the halls of hospitals, and caring for their loved ones while their world somewhat literally falls down around them. This memoir offers a been-there, done-that to those who have perhaps only partially been there, and lessons on the necessity and difficulty of letting go can be found among the miasma of Marshall's trying to do it all. He doesn't fail, but he's only human. That's what counts most in this raucous, rowdy, heartbreaking story.--Kinney, Eloise Copyright 2015 Booklist

Kirkus Book Review

In his first book, a 20-something recounts his battles with caring for a mother fighting cancer and a father with Lou Gehrig's disease. As a young professional newly graduated from college, Utah native Marshall was on top of the world. Not only did he and his siblings come from wealth and live with "the proverbial silver spoon jammed firmly up our asses"; he also had a job and girlfriend he loved in Los Angeles, a city he enjoyed for its "traffic and pollution and assholes speeding around in BMWs." The one shadow on his good fortune was having a mother sick with cancer. But even that difficulty was one Marshall and his family had overcome thanks to his father, a man who had held chaos at bay with his unflagging devotion to them all. Then one day, Marshall learned that his father had been diagnosed with ALS, a disease that was "a real ugly motherfucker andpretty much a death sentence." At first, the family tried to carry on their lives as though nothing had changed. However, less than a year after the diagnosis, Marshall's siblings told him that he needed to come home to help care for both parents. It was then he realized that "life [wasn't] all about gin and tonics and sunsets." For the next year, Marshall watched as his once healthy and active father declined into near total helplessness and his traumatized mother reeled from chemotherapy and drugs that addled her brain. Relationships between him, his siblings, and his friends strained to the breaking point. Marshall then had to face his own personal losses, which included the end of a long-term relationship he believed would culminate in marriage. Though the author's potty-mouthed profanity can be trying, the book is funny, heartbreaking, and unapologetically crude. Strangely enough, as Marshall is forced into awareness of life's harsher realities and grows up, his linguistic coarseness gives way to a narrative that manages to be quite touching. A poignantly provocative memoir. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.