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Spiders of New Zealand and their world-wide kin / Ray Forster and Lyn Forster ; with a foreword by Norman I. Platnick.

By: Forster, R. R. (Raymond Robert), 1922-.
Contributor(s): Forster, L. M. (Lyndsay McLaren) | Forster, L. M. (Lyndsay McLaren), 1925-2009 | Forster, L. M. (Lyndsay McLaren), 1925-2009 [author.] | Otago Museum | Forster, L.M.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Dunedin, N.Z. : University of Otago Press in association with Otago Museum, 1999Description: vi, 270 pages : illustrations (some color), maps ; 29 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 1877133795 (pbk.) :.Subject(s): Spiders -- New Zealand | SpidersDDC classification: 595.440993
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Non-Fiction Alexander Library | Te Rerenga Mai o Te Kauru
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Stack Room 595.44 FOR 2 Reference Only Temporarily unavailable for check out
Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
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Non-Fiction 595.44 FOR 3 Available

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Organized into chapters covering different types of spiders, such as jumping spiders, spaceweb spiders, or hunting spiders, this book incorporates hundreds of color photographs and b&w drawings to visually illustrate the tremendous diversity among spider species in New Zealand. The Forsters, both scholars with an emphasis in natural history living

Includes bibliographical references (p. [258]-264) and index.

2 3 5 6 7 11 18 19 20 22 27 39 44 49 74 76 89 91 92 93 94 100 115 149 158 161 165

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Foreword (p. vii)
  • Acknowledgements (p. 1)
  • Introducing spiders (p. 3)
  • 1 Structure and behaviour of spiders (p. 9)
  • 2 The life of a spider (p. 33)
  • 3 Spider relatives (p. 47)
  • Mites: Order Acari (p. 48)
  • False scorpions: Order Chelonethi (p. 49)
  • Harvestmen: Order Opiliones (p. 52)
  • 4 Trapdoor spiders and their kin: Mygalomorphae (p. 59)
  • Hexathelidae (p. 61)
  • Idiopidae (p. 64)
  • Nemesiidae (p. 66)
  • Migidae (p. 67)
  • 5 Living fossils: Araneomorphae (p. 69)
  • Hypochilidae (p. 72)
  • Austrochilidae (p. 73)
  • Gradungulidae (p. 73)
  • 6 Free-living spiders (p. 82)
  • Wolf spiders: Lycosidae (p. 82)
  • Nurseryweb spiders: Pisauridae (p. 87)
  • 7 Crab spiders (p. 95)
  • Giant crab spiders: Sparassidae (p. 95)
  • Small crab spiders: Thomisidae (p. 95)
  • 8 Hunting spiders (p. 105)
  • Lynx spiders: Oxyopidae (p. 105)
  • Hopping spiders: Clubionidae (p. 106)
  • Fleet-footed spiders: Corinnidae (p. 106)
  • Prowling spiders: Miturgidae (p. 107)
  • Stealthy spiders: Gnaphosidae (p. 109)
  • White-tailed spiders: Lamponidae (p. 111)
  • Pirate spiders: Mimetidae (p. 112)
  • Shield spiders: Malkaridae (p. 113)
  • Scuttling spiders: Cycloctenidae (p. 114)
  • 9 Jumping spiders: Salticidae (p. 117)
  • 10 Six-eyed spiders (p. 135)
  • Orsolobidae (p. 136)
  • Dysderidae (p. 139)
  • Segestriidae (p. 141)
  • Periegopidae (p. 143)
  • Scytodidae (p. 144)
  • Oonopidae (p. 144)
  • 11 Orbweb spiders (p. 145)
  • Araneidae (p. 156)
  • Tetragnathidae (p. 164)
  • Nanometidae (p. 166)
  • Ray spiders: Theridiosomatidae (p. 168)
  • Uloboridae (p. 169)
  • Deinopidae (p. 169)
  • 12 Spaceweb spiders (p. 171)
  • Cobweb spiders: Theridiidae (p. 171)
  • Stiphidiidae (p. 183)
  • Pholcidae (p. 187)
  • Linyphiidae (p. 189)
  • Synotaxidae (p. 192)
  • Cyatholipidae (p. 193)
  • Neolanidae (p. 195)
  • 13 Midget spiders (p. 197)
  • Anapidae (p. 197)
  • Micropholcommatidae (p. 199)
  • Mysmenidae (p. 200)
  • The Archaeid group (p. 202)
  • Holarchaeidae (p. 203)
  • Mecysmaucheniidae (p. 203)
  • Pararchaeidae (p. 204)
  • Erigoninae (Linyphiidae) (p. 205)
  • Hahniidae (p. 207)
  • Phoroncidiinae (Theridiidae) (p. 208)
  • 14 Seashore spiders (p. 209)
  • Desidae (p. 210)
  • Anyphaenidae (p. 212)
  • Agelenidae (p. 213)
  • 15 Hackled-silk spiders (p. 221)
  • Dictynidae (p. 222)
  • Agelenidae (p. 223)
  • Amaurobiidae (p. 223)
  • Nicodamidae (p. 227)
  • Oecobidae (p. 228)
  • Amphinectidae (p. 229)
  • 16 Four families (p. 233)
  • Zodariidae (p. 233)
  • Ctenidae (p. 234)
  • Psechridae (p. 234)
  • Huttoniidae (p. 235)
  • 17 Harmful spiders (p. 237)
  • 18 How to find and study spiders (p. 247)
  • Appendix I World list of spider families (p. 255)
  • Appendix II Historical notes on early arachnologists (p. 256)
  • Select bibliography (p. 258)
  • Index (p. 265)

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Spiders are among the megadiverse groups of animals, behind only the five largest insect orders in numbers of species. For centuries, knowledge of the diversity of spiders has been strongly biased toward the Northern Hemisphere, particularly Europe and North America, giving a very incomplete picture of the diversity of these creatures on Earth. In the last few decades this has been changing, largely through the years of work of arachnidologists Ray Forster and Lyn Forster (Univ. of Otago, New Zealand). This is the first book produced for a general audience that reflects the major changes in spider taxonomy, including new families and an account of the discovery of "living fossils" Gradungulidae and Austrochilidae. Although the primary focus is on New Zealand spiders, much of what has been found in New Zealand has held true for Araneae of the Southern Hemisphere. The book is richly illustrated, with many color photos by the authors as well as numerous black-and-white drawings. Numerous references; large index. Since many of the families have a worldwide distribution, the book will interest anyone studying spiders or biodiversity. Upper-division undergraduates and up. G. E. Stratton; University of Mississippi