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When we wake / Karen Healey.

By: Healey, Karen [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Sydney : Allen & Unwin, 2013Copyright date: ©2013Description: 291 pages ; 20 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781742378084 (pbk.); 1742378080 (pbk).Subject(s): Science fiction -- Juvenile fiction | Dystopias -- Juvenile fiction | Cryonics -- Juvenile fictionGenre/Form: Young adult fiction, New Zealand.DDC classification: NZ823.3
Contents:
Novel for young adults by a New Zealand author. -Finalist in Young Adult Fiction, New Zealand Post Book Awards for Children & Young Adults 2014. -"In 2027, sixteen-year-old Tegan is just like every other girl--playing the guitar, falling in love, and protesting the wrongs of the world with her friends. But then Tegan dies, waking up 100 years in the future as the unknowing first government guinea pig to be cryogenically frozen and successfully revived. Appalling secrets about her new world come to light, and Tegan must choose to either keep her head down or fight for a better future"--Provided by publisher. First person recount.
Summary: "In 2027, sixteen-year-old Tegan is just like every other girl--playing the guitar, falling in love, and protesting the wrongs of the world with her friends. But then Tegan dies, waking up 100 years in the future as the unknowing first government guinea pig to be cryogenically frozen and successfully revived. Appalling secrets about her new world come to light, and Tegan must choose to either keep her head down or fight for a better future"--Provided by publisher. First person recount.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due
Teenage Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Teenage Fiction
Teenage Fiction HEA 1 Available

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Sixteen-year-old Tegan is just like every other girl living in 2027 - she's happiest when playing the guitar, she's falling in love for the first time, and she's joining her friends to protest the wrongs of the world: environmental collapse, social discrimination, and political injustice. But on what should have been the best day of Tegan's life, she dies - and wakes up a hundred years in the future, locked in a government facility with no idea what happened. Tegan is the first person to be cryonically frozen and successfully revived, which makes her an instant celebrity - though all she wants is to rebuild some semblance of a normal life...including spending as much time as possible with musically gifted Abdi, even if he does seem to hate the sight of her. But the future isn't all she hoped it would be, and when appalling secrets come to light, Tegan must make a choice: Does she keep her head down and survive, or fight for a better future? Award-winning author Karen Healey has created a gripping tale of an inspiring heroine living in a not-so-distant future that could easily be our own.

Novel for young adults by a New Zealand author. -Finalist in Young Adult Fiction, New Zealand Post Book Awards for Children & Young Adults 2014. -"In 2027, sixteen-year-old Tegan is just like every other girl--playing the guitar, falling in love, and protesting the wrongs of the world with her friends. But then Tegan dies, waking up 100 years in the future as the unknowing first government guinea pig to be cryogenically frozen and successfully revived. Appalling secrets about her new world come to light, and Tegan must choose to either keep her head down or fight for a better future"--Provided by publisher. First person recount.

"In 2027, sixteen-year-old Tegan is just like every other girl--playing the guitar, falling in love, and protesting the wrongs of the world with her friends. But then Tegan dies, waking up 100 years in the future as the unknowing first government guinea pig to be cryogenically frozen and successfully revived. Appalling secrets about her new world come to light, and Tegan must choose to either keep her head down or fight for a better future"--Provided by publisher. First person recount.

Secondary.

For young adults.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

Publishers Weekly Review

Awakening from cryogenic stasis 100 years after being accidentally shot by a sniper, 16-year-old Tegan Oglietti must adjust to a new life in 22nd-century Australia. The big question, both for readers and for Tegan: why has she been revived? The answer, which is gradually revealed through Tegan's confessional-style narration, demonstrates that, despite technological and other advances, human greed, corruption, and self-interest persist across the centuries. Healey (The Shattering) constructs a very persuasive future world, whose technology, slang, hyperconnectivity, and climatic peril are smartly extrapolated from contemporary society (meat consumption is heavily taxed, drugs are regulated and safe, and Australia has a strict "No Migrant" policy in place). The diversity of the cast is authentic and natural, from the lesbian and transgendered friends Tegan makes to her love interest, a brusque Somali classmate with secrets of his own. Healey doesn't make her points about social justice and activism through big, flashy moments; the story's injustices unfold in a way that's stark and unvarnished, and Tegan's determination to right the wrongs she finds will hit home with readers. Ages 12-up. Agent: Barry Goldblatt, Barry Goldblatt Literary. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

School Library Journal Review

Gr 8 Up-Tegan was just 16 when she died-well, sort of. After being shot at a protest in Sydney in 2027, she awakes in the future in a government facility where she's been preserved and frozen for 100 years. Being the first successfully revived human in Australia means that Tegan is an instant celebrity in a world that is much different from the one that she knows. As she struggles to build a life for herself with some sense of normalcy, she learns that not all citizens are excited about the scientific advancement that brought her back to life, and that the government that saved her might not have the best intentions. When We Wake kicks off with a great premise that's an easy sell to teens in this age of dystopian fiction. Tegan is a relatable character placed in a future that, while advanced, is creepily easy to envision. The story drags a bit in the middle, leaving time for readers to figure out some "secrets" before the main character does. Overall, this is a solid addition to the books that engross teens and have them wondering what's to stop this future from becoming our own.-Emily Chornomaz, Camden County Library System, NJ (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Booklist Review

Just when 16-year-old Tegan finally has a hot date with Dalmar in her futuristic world of 2027, a sniper accidentally shoots and kills her. A century later, Tegan, the first successful cryogenic revival, awakens to discover a changed society: more tolerance toward same-sex relationships, a government that strongly enforces migrant policy, and an overpopulated planet on the brink of environmental collapse. In Tegan's conversational, first-person narration, it quickly becomes clear that she's on the run, divulging government secrets blog-style along the way. Healey doesn't enter much new territory here, but Tegan's nonstop adventures evading paparazzi as the Living Dead Girl, learning the government's real motivation for unfreezing her, and determining the reason behind a religious fundamentalist sect's mission against her will keep both sci-fi and dystopian readers entertained. A host of multicultural characters, including a Somali love interest, add depth, while chapter headings taken from Beatles lyrics underscore Tegan's musical interest. Pair with Beth Revis' Across the Universe (2011) for another look at cryogenics in action.--Leeper, Angela Copyright 2010 Booklist

Horn Book Review

On an ordinary day in 2027, sixteen-year-old Australian Tegan Oglietti is on her way to attend a climate change protest when she's shot and killed by a sniper. She wakes up to find that she's been cryogenically frozen for a century, and everyone she knows is long dead. Tegan is subject to intense military supervision and media scrutiny (the press calls her the "Living Dead Girl," and various political and religious groups all have opinions about her existence). But she bravely adjusts to her new reality, attending school, making friends, and learning new technology. When she hears about the mysterious "Ark Project," however, Tegan (with the help of new love interest Abdi) resolves to discover what secrets the government is keeping -- and once she does, she finds herself in danger and on the run. This gripping dystopic novel creates a future that logically extends the problems facing us today, such as human rights abuses, climate change, and diminishing natural resources. It ingeniously links this future to our time: for example, Tegan loves the Beatles, and chapter titles are named after their songs. Tegan is a passionate, stubborn protagonist determined to make a difference, and her anger at humanity is palpable. "You are not the future I wanted!...I wanted you to be better! Be better!" she screams at the indifferent people of the future -- a warning and a wake-up call for us, too. rachel l. smith (c) Copyright 2013. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Kirkus Book Review

In a fast-moving and carefully built science-fiction story, Tegan Oglietti attends a climate change rally in 2027 and wakes up in a hospital just over 100 years later. Soon after waking, Tegan learns that a sniper shot her at the rally, and her body was frozen using an experimental technique. Tegan is the first person to be awoken from a frozen state and is, as she discovers when she tries to flee the hospital, the subject of much journalistic curiosity. Although her government handlers try to keep her out of the public eye, she is allowed to live with one of her doctors as well as to attend school. There, she meets a cast of well-drawn characters, including Bethari, a savvy aspiring journalist; Joph, a chemistry genius who creates legal drugs; and Abdi, a singer from Djibouti in Australia on a rare visa. As Tegan's handlers become increasingly sinister, the teens begin investigating the project that brought Tegan back. The worldbuilding is thorough and expressed easily without ever lapsing into tiresome exposition. Tegan's friends are a fully realized multiracial and substantially LGBT cast, and even Tegan's whiteness is reflected upon thoughtfully. The ending is complete enough to provide some closure, but readers may hope to learn more about this world and its characters in a second volume. Accessible, thoughtful and compelling--science fiction done right. (Science fiction. 12 up)]] Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.