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The welcome of strangers : an ethnohistory of southern Maori A.D. 1650-1850 / Atholl Anderson.

By: Anderson, Atholl.
Contributor(s): Dunedin (N.Z.). City Council.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Dunedin, N.Z. : Otago University Press in association with Dunedin City Council, 1998Description: 249 pages : illustrations, facsimiles, geneological tables, maps, portraits ; 26 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 1877133418 (pbk.) :; 1877133590 (hbk.) :.Subject(s): Kāi Tahu (New Zealand people) -- History | Maori (New Zealand people) -- Social life and customs | Maori (New Zealand people) -- New Zealand -- South Island -- History | Maori (New Zealand people) -- New Zealand -- South Island -- Social life and customs | Ethnology -- New Zealand | Ngati Mamoe (New Zealand people) -- History | Kōrero nehe | Tikanga | South Island (N.Z.) -- History | New Zealand -- Social life and customsDDC classification: 993.7 | 305.89940937
Contents:
Iwi origins -- Hapu migrations -- Claiming the South -- Takata pora -- Kai huanga & Robulla -- Rangatiratanga & Manawhenua -- Managing the land -- Mahinga kai -- Northern forest & plain - Southern coast & interior -- A poor remnant now -- Transformations.
Summary: Maori in the south of New Zealand had a lifestyle quite distinct form their northern cousins, and different experiences of contact with Europeans. This book provides an insight into those times, covering the period 1650-1850, and focusing on Maori history from Marlborough to Stewart Island.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due
Te Taurawhiri Non-Fiction Alexander Library | Te Rerenga Mai o Te Kauru
Te Taurawhiri
Te Taurawhiri 993.01 AND 1 Available
Te Taurawhiri Non-Fiction Alexander Library | Te Rerenga Mai o Te Kauru
Te Taurawhiri
Te Taurawhiri 993.01 AND 3 Available
Te Taurawhiri Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Te Taurawhiri
Te Taurawhiri 993.01 AND 2 Available

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Several years ago, Maori in the south of New Zealand had a lifestyle quite distinct from their northern cousins, and different experiences of contact with Europeans. This book provides an insight into those times, covering the period 1650-1850, and focusing on Maori history from Marlborough to Stewart Island.

"First published 1998 to commemorate the 150th anniversary of Otago and Southland"--T.p. verso.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 233-240) and index.

Iwi origins -- Hapu migrations -- Claiming the South -- Takata pora -- Kai huanga & Robulla -- Rangatiratanga & Manawhenua -- Managing the land -- Mahinga kai -- Northern forest & plain - Southern coast & interior -- A poor remnant now -- Transformations.

Maori in the south of New Zealand had a lifestyle quite distinct form their northern cousins, and different experiences of contact with Europeans. This book provides an insight into those times, covering the period 1650-1850, and focusing on Maori history from Marlborough to Stewart Island.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Anderson describes the arrival and spread of the Ngai Tahu clan of southern Maori to New Zealand's South Island, particularly recounting the changes that occurred later when they welcomed European strangers. The author's method was ethnohistorical rather than archaeological, and was commissioned as a broad-scale (meaning socially inclusive) tribal history focused on the complicated southern Maori network of social and economic ties. For an anthropologist, this is a fascinating look at chiefly political dynamics and intrigue, and adept Maori adaptations in a political climate heated up by the presence of Europeans. The book documents a shift in tribal leadership traits away from prowess in clan warfare and inheritance of authority toward those who became adept in dealing with pakeha. It is ironic that many of the clan feuds within which the Ngai Tahu were embroiled on the eve of the pakeha arrival were over contested rights to land and resources. Comprehension of the book's breadth is enhanced by prior knowledge of New Zealand culture history, language, and geography. The last chapter ("Transformations") develops a comparative perspective that underscores the importance of southern Maori particulars in a wider framework. Upper-division undergraduates and above. S. R. Martin; Michigan Technological University