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The battle of the Atlantic : how the allies won the war / Jonathan Dimbleby.

By: Dimbleby, Jonathan [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: [London] : Viking, an imprint of Penguin Books, 2015Description: xxx, 530 pages, 24 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations, facsimiles, maps, portraits ; 25 cm.Content type: text | still image | cartographic image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780241186602; 9780241972106.Subject(s): World War, 1939-1945 -- Campaigns -- Atlantic OceanSummary: The Battle of the Atlantic was - though often overlooked - crucial to the Allied victory. If the German U-boats had prevailed, the maritime artery across the Atlantic would have been severed. Mass hunger would have consumed Britain, and the Allied armies would have been prevented from joining in the invasion of Europe. There would have been no D-Day. Through fascinating contemporary diaries and letters, from the leaders and from the sailors on all sides, Jonathan Dimbleby creates a thrilling narrative that uniquely places the campaign in the context of the entire Second World War. Challenging conventional wisdom on the use of intelligence and on Churchill's bombing campaign, The Battle of the Atlantic tells the epic story of the decisions that led to victory, and the horror and humanity of life on those perilous seas.
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Non-Fiction 940.54293 DIM 1 Checked out 31/10/2019

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

The Battle of the Atlantic was -- though often overlooked -- crucial to the Allied victory. If the German U-boats had prevailed, the maritime artery across the Atlantic would have been severed. Mass hunger would have consumed Britain, and the Allied armies would have been prevented from joining in the invasion of Europe. There would have been no D-Day. Through fascinating contemporary diaries and letters, from the leaders and from the sailors on all sides, Jonathan Dimbleby creates a thrilling narrative that uniquely places the campaign in the context of the entire Second World War. Challenging conventional wisdom on the use of intelligence and on Churchill's bombing campaign, The Battle of the Atlantic tells the epic story of thedecisions that led to victory, and the horror and humanity of life on those perilous seas.

Reissued in paperback in 2016.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

The Battle of the Atlantic was - though often overlooked - crucial to the Allied victory. If the German U-boats had prevailed, the maritime artery across the Atlantic would have been severed. Mass hunger would have consumed Britain, and the Allied armies would have been prevented from joining in the invasion of Europe. There would have been no D-Day. Through fascinating contemporary diaries and letters, from the leaders and from the sailors on all sides, Jonathan Dimbleby creates a thrilling narrative that uniquely places the campaign in the context of the entire Second World War. Challenging conventional wisdom on the use of intelligence and on Churchill's bombing campaign, The Battle of the Atlantic tells the epic story of the decisions that led to victory, and the horror and humanity of life on those perilous seas.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

The naval contest that raged over the -Atlantic during much of World War II ended up costing the lives of tens of thousands of British, German, and American sailors. This titanic struggle between the surface navies of the Allies and the submarines or U-boats of the Axis powers has received a good amount of attention over the past decade, with solid accounts such as Richard Snow's A Measureless Peril. Dimbleby, a writer and filmmaker, adds his own deeply researched and well-crafted assessment. Using secondary sources as well as primary accounts, the author weaves a fascinating tale of strategy and tactics between the stealthy German submarines and the British and American efforts to develop an effective defense against sudden attack. As the war progressed, the Allies improved their code-breaking, radar equipment, and air support; eventually Germany was unable to replace their lost sea craft. The author muses that if the British had devoted more of their resources toward the Atlantic struggle earlier in the war, thus achieving superiority on the seas and allowing the Allies to invade France in 1943 instead of 1944, perhaps the Americans could have taken Berlin instead of the Russians. VERDICT For all collections supporting the history of World War II.-Ed Goedeken, Iowa State Univ. Lib., Ames © Copyright 2016. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Publishers Weekly Review

Dimbleby (Destiny in the Desert), an experienced journalist and historian, makes a convincing case that of all the campaigns of WWII, the struggle for dominance over the North Atlantic was the most important. In support of his thesis, Dimbleby effectively describes the strategic situation as seen from London, Berlin, and Washington. Through the carefully researched actions of the senior leadership, he demonstrates that all of the senior naval and political leaders were aware of the importance of the campaign. The book shows how close the Germans came to victory: in 1941, the Allies could only replace one-third of the ships lost, and in 1942 the Germans destroyed a million tons more shipping than was replaced. Equally well done is Dimbleby's telling of the personal experiences, using diaries, letters, and ship's logs, including his descriptions of a days-long fight to survive in a life raft in the frigid North Atlantic and an hours-long depth-charge attack endured 700 feet below the surface of the ocean. The history of the battle for the Atlantic is well documented, but Dimbleby's work, with its emphasis on the strategic importance of the battle, is an excellent addition to the story, and expert historians as well as general readers can enjoy this effort. (Mar.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Kirkus Book Review

A fine account of the brutal sea campaign against Nazi Germany, from writer and broadcaster Dimbleby (Destiny in the Desert: The Road to El Alamein, 2013, etc.). On Sept. 3, 1939, hours after hostilities began, a U-boat torpedoed the liner Athenia about 200 miles off the coast of Ireland. With the benefit of hindsight, historians proclaim the event's significance ("the sinking revealed in a single blow how unready Britain was for a conflict in which the U-boat would become Germany's principal weapon against Allied merchant shipping"), but no contemporary leader got the message. Despite his prescience on Hitler, once Churchill took office, his strategy was mostly wrong. As First Lord of the Admiralty in 1939, he maintained that Germany's surface fleet was its greatest threat. As Prime Minister in 1940, he shared the universal delusion that air power held the key. Fortunately, Hitler shared this fantasy. By April 1940, the handful of U-boats on patrol sank nearly 250 ships. Churchill was worried, but Britain was slow to enforce a convoy system and remained short of escorts. Air force chiefs stubbornly refused to assign long-range bombers for anti-submarine patrol. Germany's decoding of British naval ciphers was far superior to its vaunted British Enigma counterparts, and U-boat production was increasing. Consequently, sinkings rose alarmingly for three years before the Allies got their act together. The turning point was April 1943, when the air forces finally coughed up a fleet of long-range bombers. Later, Churchill wrote that the U-boat sinkings were "the only thing that ever really frightened me during the war." Recent historians such as Clay Blair emphasize that the Allied supply line was never seriously in jeopardy, but Dimbleby sticks to the traditional cliffhanger version, delivering a gripping history overflowing with anecdotes and enough calamity, misery, explosions, and individual valor for a Hollywood disaster epic. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.