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Katherine Carlyle / Rupert Thomson.

By: Thomson, Rupert [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: London : Corsair, 2015Description: 289 pages ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781472150622 (paperback); 9781472150615; 1472150627.Subject(s): Cryonics -- Fiction | Self-realisation in women -- Fiction | Self-actualization (Psychology) in women -- FictionGenre/Form: Domestic fiction.DDC classification: 823/.914 Summary: In the late 80s, Katherine Carlyle is created using IVF. Stored as a frozen embryo for eight years, she is then implanted in her mother and given life. By the age of nineteen Katherine has lost her mother to cancer, and feels her father to be an increasingly distant figure. Instead of going to college, she decides to disappear, telling no one where she has gone. What begins as an attempt to punish her father for his absence gradually becomes a testing-ground of his love for her, a coming-to-terms with the death of her mother, and finally the mise-en-scene for a courageous leap from false empowerment to true empowerment. Written in the beautifully spare, lucid and cinematic prose that Thomson is known for, Katherine Carlyle uses the modern techniques of IVF and cryopreservation to throw new light on the myth of origins. It is a profound and moving novel about where we come from, what we make of ourselves, and how we are loved.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

The contemporary story concerning the discovering of one's self; identity and family.

In the late 80s, Katherine Carlyle is created using IVF. Stored as a frozen embryo for eight years, she is then implanted in her mother and given life. By the age of nineteen Katherine has lost her mother to cancer, and feels her father to be an increasingly distant figure. Instead of going to college, she decides to disappear, telling no one where she has gone. What begins as an attempt to punish her father for his absence gradually becomes a testing-ground of his love for her, a coming-to-terms with the death of her mother, and finally the mise-en-scene for a courageous leap from false empowerment to true empowerment. Written in the beautifully spare, lucid and cinematic prose that Thomson is known for, Katherine Carlyle uses the modern techniques of IVF and cryopreservation to throw new light on the myth of origins. It is a profound and moving novel about where we come from, what we make of ourselves, and how we are loved.

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Kotui multi-version record.

Excerpt provided by Syndetics

Two days later, on September 8, I flag down a taxi on Corso Vittorio Emanuele II. I have a suitcase with me, and my new umbrella. Draped over my right arm is the cashmere coat my father gave me when I turned eighteen. I'm carrying my passport, several credit cards, and a printout of my boarding pass. Round my neck is my most valuable possession--a small, silver heart-shaped locket containing two pieces of my mother's hair, one blond and wavy, the other a glinting dark brown, almost metallic. The blond hair is what fell out when she first had chemotherapy. The brown is what grew back. I have closed my deposit account and withdrawn my savings. The money my mother left me. My inheritance. It's enough to keep me going for a while.             A few hours earlier, at dawn, I walked to the Ponte Mazzini, my phone in my hand. The city sticky-eyed, hungover. Still half-asleep. I stopped next to a lamppost in the middle of the bridge. White mist drifting above the river, a blurred pink sun. Leaning on the parapet, I held my phone out over the water and then let go. I thought I heard it ringing as it fell. Who would be calling so early? Massimo? Dani? I would never know. [...] Back in the apartment I downloaded Eraser and cleaned my hard drive, not just deleting my files but overwriting them so as to make retrieval more or less impossible. I left my laptop under the arch on Via Giulia with a note that said free computer. If I'm to pay proper attention, if this is to work, there's no option but to disconnect, to simplify. From now on, life will register directly, like a tap on the shoulder or a kiss on the lips. It will be felt . Excerpted from Katherine Carlyle by Rupert Thomson All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Conceived in a fertility lab where she languished for eight years before being implanted in her mother's womb, Katherine Carlyle has never gotten over the long period of absence. That sense of loss deepens after her mother dies from ovarian cancer, which may have been caused by her IVF treatments. Katherine takes her resentment out on her father, a globe-trotting journalist, when she decides to cut herself off from him and from everyone else in her life. Instead of leaving for Oxford University as planned, she erases all traces of herself and reroutes to Berlin in search of a man she has only heard discussed by strangers in a movie theater. After briefly connecting with him, she moves on to other random men until she obtains a Russian visa and heads for Ugolgrad, a remote outpost in the frozen north. VERDICT Katherine -Carlyle is an oddly compelling heroine whose eccentric disappearing act becomes a journey of self-discovery. This is a novel with panache.-Barbara Love, -formerly with Kingston Frontenac P.L., Ont. © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Publishers Weekly Review

In Thomson's (Secrecy) wonderfully written novel, London native Katherine "Kit" Carlyle is a headstrong, fanciful, and flighty 19-year-old living in Rome. Her father, David, is a roving CNN journalist who was largely an absent parent, and her mother, Stephanie, died of cancer six years previously. Having landed a scholarship to study at Oxford University, Kit obsesses over the fact that she is an IVF baby: she was stored for eight years as an embryo before she was implanted in Stephanie. Kit feels as if David blames her for causing Stephanie's cancer by the IVF procedure, so Kit decides to run away and come to terms with her own identity. Kit travels to Berlin to stay with the orthodontist Klaus Frings, demonstrating her uncanny knack for meeting a series of helpful, generous strangers. All the while, she enjoys fantasizing about the scenes of her frantic, desperate father searching for her, and she even arranges rendezvous with him, which she doesn't attend. She calls herself Misty and leaves Berlin to stay in Moscow, adding another layer of deception to her vanishing act. Thomson's seamless prose style and striking minor characters round out this satisfying, offbeat narrative. (Oct.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Booklist Review

Katherine, better known as Kit, is expected to begin her college studies at Oxford, but with her father busy reporting in distant countries, who really cares what she does with her life? Instead, she leaves her home in Rome to pursue a man in Germany whose name and address she overheard in a cinema. From there, she follows a string of coincidences to the far reaches of the earth, seeking a new life that will remove her from the memories of her mother's death and punish her father for his seeming indifference. With every step she takes farther from home, though, she wonders what her father will do when he finds her missing and if he'll try to find her. Ostensibly a journey in search of solitude, Kit's increasingly reckless path lays bare the truth about her flight, that the act of running away may actually be a plea for being found. Thomson's simply stated prose is made richer by the flaws of Kit's character, resulting in an honest and worthy story of self-discovery.--Ophoff, Cortney Copyright 2015 Booklist

Kirkus Book Review

A young woman sets out to find the isolation she craves in Thomson's (Secrecy, 2014, etc.) picaresque novel. The 19-year-old title character retains vague memories of being an IVF embryo. Her mother's death and the perpetual absence of her father, a CNN reporter, contribute to a life in which being solitary is the natural state. To bring her physical circumstance into concert with her psychic state, Katherine, a few weeks before she's due to enter Oxford, cleans out her bank accounts and, without telling anyone, takes off for stark and increasingly bleak surroundings culminating in a remote island in northern Russia. Unlike the hero of her favorite film, Antonioni's The Passenger, Katherine wants less to start over than to exist in a state of anonymity. For Thomson, Katherine's quest is an understandable reaction to a digital world that's both intrusive and disconnected. But though her voice achieves a consistent tone of blank angst, Katherine feels more a construct than a character. Worse, the intrusive passages in which she imagines her father's attempts to find her threaten to make her flight seem an adolescent stunt. The finish, in which Thomson brings together all the book's strands, is a technical feat and, because of the cruelty to which he subjects Katherine and the triteness of the denouement, both homiletic and sadistic. A book that promises insight into the emotional detachment of our current technological overload should deliver more than the resolution of daddy issues. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.