Whanganuilibrary.com
Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Nowhere's child : the inspiring story of how one woman survived Hitler's breeding camps and found an Irish home / Kari Rosvall with Naomi Linehan.

By: Rosvall, Kari, 1944- [author.].
Contributor(s): Linehan, Naomi [author.] | Linehan, Naomi.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Castleknock, Dublin, Ireland : Hachette Books Ireland, 2015Copyright date: ©2015Description: 278 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (some colour) ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781473609471 (pbk.); 147360947X.Subject(s): Rosvall, Kari, 1944- | Lebensborn e.V. (Germany) | Children of collabourationists -- Norway -- Biography | World War, 1939-1945 -- Children -- NorwayDDC classification: 948.104092
Contents:
Up until the age of 64, much of Kari Rosvall's early life was shrouded in mystery. Then, one day, a letter arrived through the post . . . In it was a small black-and-white photograph of Kari as a young baby, the first she had ever seen. Kari was to finally discover the dark secret of her conception: She was a Lebensborn child, part of Hitler's 'Spring of Life' programme, which encouraged Nazi soldiers to have children with Scandinavian women in order to create an Aryan race. And so began a journey back to her roots: to Norway where, at ten days old, she was taken from her mother, packed into a crate and sent to Germany to join the other Lebensborn children; to post-War Germany and her eventual rescue by the Red Cross from an attic, a tiny, neglected outcast of a dead regime. Nowhere's Child is a remarkable story of reconciliation, of forging new beginnings from a dark past and of the discovery of family later in life. Ultimately, it is the life-affirming account of what it really means to find a place called home.
Summary: Up until the age of 64, much of Kari Rosvall's early life was shrouded in mystery. Then, one day, a letter arrived through the post . . . In it was a small black-and-white photograph of Kari as a young baby, the first she had ever seen. Kari was to finally discover the dark secret of her conception: She was a Lebensborn child, part of Hitler's 'Spring of Life' programme, which encouraged Nazi soldiers to have children with Scandinavian women in order to create an Aryan race.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due
Biographies Davis (Central) Library
Biographies
Biographies B ROS 1 Available

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Up until the age of 64, much of Kari Rosvall's early life was shrouded in mystery. Then, one day, a letter arrived through the post . . .

In it was a small black-and-white photograph of Kari as a young baby, the first she had ever seen. Kari was to finally discover the dark secret of her conception: She was a Lebensborn child, part of Hitler's 'Spring of Life' programme, which encouraged Nazi soldiers to have children with Scandinavian women in order to create an Aryan race.

And so began a journey back to her roots: to Norway where, at ten days old, she was taken from her mother, packed into a crate and sent to Germany to join the other Lebensborn children; to post-War Germany and her eventual rescue by the Red Cross from an attic, a tiny, neglected outcast of a dead regime.

Nowhere's Child is a remarkable story of reconciliation, of forging new beginnings from a dark past and of the discovery of family later in life. Ultimately, it is the life-affirming account of what it really means to find a place called home.

Up until the age of 64, much of Kari Rosvall's early life was shrouded in mystery. Then, one day, a letter arrived through the post . . . In it was a small black-and-white photograph of Kari as a young baby, the first she had ever seen. Kari was to finally discover the dark secret of her conception: She was a Lebensborn child, part of Hitler's 'Spring of Life' programme, which encouraged Nazi soldiers to have children with Scandinavian women in order to create an Aryan race. And so began a journey back to her roots: to Norway where, at ten days old, she was taken from her mother, packed into a crate and sent to Germany to join the other Lebensborn children; to post-War Germany and her eventual rescue by the Red Cross from an attic, a tiny, neglected outcast of a dead regime. Nowhere's Child is a remarkable story of reconciliation, of forging new beginnings from a dark past and of the discovery of family later in life. Ultimately, it is the life-affirming account of what it really means to find a place called home.

Up until the age of 64, much of Kari Rosvall's early life was shrouded in mystery. Then, one day, a letter arrived through the post . . . In it was a small black-and-white photograph of Kari as a young baby, the first she had ever seen. Kari was to finally discover the dark secret of her conception: She was a Lebensborn child, part of Hitler's 'Spring of Life' programme, which encouraged Nazi soldiers to have children with Scandinavian women in order to create an Aryan race.

2 5 11 18 19 20 24 28 30 33 45 49 60 66 68 93 96 97 100 103 135 138 147 151 159 164 178 189

HU_NEWNF, NEWBKS-HU1