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Where my heart used to beat / Sebastian Faulks.

By: Faulks, Sebastian [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: London : Hutchinson, 2015Description: 326 pages ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780091936839 (hardback); 9780091936846 (paperback); 9780091936853.Subject(s): Physicians -- France -- Fiction | World War, 1939-1945 -- Fiction | Nineteen sixties -- Fiction | History, Modern -- 20th century -- Fiction | Reminiscing in old age -- Fiction | English -- France -- Fiction | Psychiatrists -- Fiction | Memory -- Fiction | Self-acceptance -- Fiction | Twentieth century -- Fiction | France -- Fiction | Italy -- FictionGenre/Form: Historical fiction.DDC classification: 823.92
Contents:
On a small island off the south coast of France, Robert Hendricks, an English doctor who has seen the best and the worst the twentieth century had to offer, is forced to confront the events that made up his life.
Summary: On a small island off the south coast of France, Robert Hendricks, an English doctor who has seen the best and the worst the twentieth century had to offer, is forced to confront the events that made up his life. His host, and antagonist, is Alexander Pereira, a man whose time is running out, but who seems to know more about his guest than Hendricks himself does. The search for sanity takes us through the war in Italy in 1944, a passionate love that seems to hold out hope, the great days of idealistic work in the 1960s and finally - unforgettably - back into the trenches of the Western Front. The recurring themes of Sebastian Faulks' fiction are here brought together with a new stylistic brilliance as the novel casts a long, baleful light over the century we have left behind but may never fully understand. Daring, ambitious and in the end profoundly moving, this is Faulks' most remarkable book yet.
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Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Fiction Collection
Fiction Collection FAU 1 Checked out 09/09/2019

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

"On a small island off the south coast of France, Robert Hendricks, an English doctor who has seen the best and the worst the twentieth century had to offer, is forced to confront the events that made up his life. His host, and antagonist, is Alexander Pereira, a man whose time is running out, but who seems to know more about his guest than Hendricks himself does. The search for sanity takes us through the war in Italy in 1944, a passionate love that seems to hold out hope, the great days of idealistic work in the 1960s and finally unforgettably back into the trenches of the Western Front. The recurring themes of Sebastian Faulks's fiction are brought together with a new stylistic brilliance as the novel casts a long, baleful light over the century we have left behind but may never fully understand. Daring, ambitious and in the end profoundly moving, this is Faulks's most remarkable book yet."

On a small island off the south coast of France, Robert Hendricks, an English doctor who has seen the best and the worst the twentieth century had to offer, is forced to confront the events that made up his life.

On a small island off the south coast of France, Robert Hendricks, an English doctor who has seen the best and the worst the twentieth century had to offer, is forced to confront the events that made up his life. His host, and antagonist, is Alexander Pereira, a man whose time is running out, but who seems to know more about his guest than Hendricks himself does. The search for sanity takes us through the war in Italy in 1944, a passionate love that seems to hold out hope, the great days of idealistic work in the 1960s and finally - unforgettably - back into the trenches of the Western Front. The recurring themes of Sebastian Faulks' fiction are here brought together with a new stylistic brilliance as the novel casts a long, baleful light over the century we have left behind but may never fully understand. Daring, ambitious and in the end profoundly moving, this is Faulks' most remarkable book yet.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

World War II veteran Robert Hendricks is an English psychiatrist of some renown specializing in conditions associated with memory and the aging brain. Returning home from a work-related sojourn in New York, he finds a cryptic invitation to a remote French island from Doctor Pereira, an admirer of his, who claims to have known his father during the World War I. Pereira wishes to share some information about Hendricks's father, who died during the war when Hendricks was only two. He also requests that Hendricks consider becoming his literary executor. The island visit with Pereira unlocks memories of Hendricks's own wartime experiences, including his deep friendships with five fellow soldiers, the events surrounding his wounding at Anzio, and, particularly, a passionate affair with a beautiful Italian nurse that ended when she returned to a husband he had not known about and from which he never recovered. Verdict Like his well-loved "Birdsong" trilogy, Faulks's new novel moves from the mud- and blood-soaked trenches of two world wars to the tenderness of a short-lived love affair and ends on a note of poignancy and uplift. [See Prepub Alert, 7/13/15.]-Barbara Love, Kingston, Ont. © Copyright 2016. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Publishers Weekly Review

The subject of war is not new to Faulks, who has explored both world wars in many of his previous works. In his 13th novel, he examines the vagaries of human nature when under siege, primarily through the eyes of Robert Hendricks, who was at the front in WWII and whose father died in WWI. Readers first meet Hendricks in 1980, when he's an accomplished British psychiatrist visiting New York for a convention. Upon his return home, he receives a letter from Alexander Pereira, a neurologist in France, who explains that he served in WWI with Hendricks's father and has a job proposition for Hendricks. The ensuing relationship between the two men serves as a balm to Hendricks. Through discussions both therapeutic and confessional, he reveals the heart of his war experiences, as well as his postwar work, and finds a kind of closure. Hendricks, whose experiences were harrowing on the one hand and joyous on the other-he met his one true love in Italy-comes to terms with the lonely life he has led since the war. Faulks is renowned and respected for his fresh approach to well-trod topics, such as combat's assault on the human psyche. Here Hendricks posits the decline of humanity in the despicable acts that occur under the guise of war, but still throws himself into trying to repair the mentally and emotionally broken. Despite everything he's experienced, he will not give up on the human race. (Jan.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Kirkus Book Review

A novel that artfully mixes memory and desire as a World War II veteran accesses painful memories of a wartime romance. In 1980, Dr. Robert Hendricks is an established psychiatrist in London with an impressive book, The Chosen Few, to his credit. One day he gets a letter from a 93-year-old therapist, Dr. Alexander Pereira, who admires his book and also has some information about his father, who died during the first world war, when Hendricks was 2. Hendricks takes Pereira up on his invitation to visit him at his home on a small island off the coast of France. Pereira had briefly known Hendricks' father during the war and has a few photographs and artifacts he wishes to shareand he also suspects that Hendricks has repressed some memories about his own war experience, which included the landing at Anzio in 1944 and a short but tempestuous relationship with Luisa, the beautiful daughter of a Genoese businessman. As one might expect, Hendricks tells much of the novel through flashbacks to his war experience, and few authors write about war as well or as vividly as Faulks. We meet a range of officers and other soldiers whom Faulks deftly avoids stereotypingthey're presented with all their flaws and gestures toward heroism and cowardice. Hendricks himself received a war wound, and with Pereira's encouragement he finally remembers howand it's not a moment of heroism. At the center of Hendricks' memories is Luisa. His tangled relationship with her shapes the rest of Hendricks' life and gives him deeper understanding of his theories about love. An absorbing look at the intimate connection between love, war, and memory. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.