Whanganuilibrary.com
Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Robert Plant : a life / by Paul Rees.

By: Rees, Paul A.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: London : HarperCollins Publishers, 2013Description: viii, 360 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780007514885 (paperback); 0007514883 (paperback); 9780007514878 (hardback); 0007514875 (hardback).Subject(s): Plant, Robert | Led Zeppelin (Musical group) | Rock musicians -- Great Britain -- BiographyDDC classification: 782.42166092
Contents:
Beginnings. The black country ; The devil's music ; King mod ; The rubber man ; The real desperation scene. -- Airborne. Boom! Boom! Boom! ; Valhalla ; Blond Elvis ; Sodom and Gomorrah ; Crash ; Darkness, darkness ; The out door. -- Solo. Exorcism ; Sea of love ; Tall cool one ; Crossroads ; Good tmes, bad times ; Down from the mountain ; Rebirth ; Gone, gone, gone ; Joy ; Coda.
Summary: Robert Plant is a living legend. The front man of Led Zeppelin, one of the biggest and most influential rock bands of all time, Plant defined the very notion of what it means to be a rock god. The sheer scale of Led Zeppelin's success is extraordinary. In the United States alone they have sold seventy million records, a figure surpassed only by the Beatles, while "Stairway to Heaven, " the band's most famous song, has been played more times on American radio than any other track and is frequently referred to as one of the greatest rock 'n' roll songs ever. But Robert Plant's legacy stretches far beyond Led Zeppelin. This biography is the story of the forces that shaped Plant: from his boyhood in England's Black Country to the ravaging highs and lows of the Zeppelin years; from his relationship with Jimmy Page and John Bonham to the solo career that today, at the age of sixty-two, has him producing some of the most acclaimed work of his career. The author, former editor of Q and Kerrang!, who has in the past interviewed Plant at length, paints a rich, complicated portrait of a man who was only nineteen when he changed the face of rock 'n' roll. This is the definitive story of a musical icon. -- From book jacket.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due
Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Non-Fiction
Non-Fiction 782.421 PLA 1 Available

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Robert Plant is one of the few genuine living rock legends.Frontman of Led Zeppelin, musical innovator and seller of millions of records, Plant has had a profound influence on music for over four decades. But the full account of his life has barely been told ... until now.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Beginnings. The black country ; The devil's music ; King mod ; The rubber man ; The real desperation scene. -- Airborne. Boom! Boom! Boom! ; Valhalla ; Blond Elvis ; Sodom and Gomorrah ; Crash ; Darkness, darkness ; The out door. -- Solo. Exorcism ; Sea of love ; Tall cool one ; Crossroads ; Good tmes, bad times ; Down from the mountain ; Rebirth ; Gone, gone, gone ; Joy ; Coda.

Robert Plant is a living legend. The front man of Led Zeppelin, one of the biggest and most influential rock bands of all time, Plant defined the very notion of what it means to be a rock god. The sheer scale of Led Zeppelin's success is extraordinary. In the United States alone they have sold seventy million records, a figure surpassed only by the Beatles, while "Stairway to Heaven, " the band's most famous song, has been played more times on American radio than any other track and is frequently referred to as one of the greatest rock 'n' roll songs ever. But Robert Plant's legacy stretches far beyond Led Zeppelin. This biography is the story of the forces that shaped Plant: from his boyhood in England's Black Country to the ravaging highs and lows of the Zeppelin years; from his relationship with Jimmy Page and John Bonham to the solo career that today, at the age of sixty-two, has him producing some of the most acclaimed work of his career. The author, former editor of Q and Kerrang!, who has in the past interviewed Plant at length, paints a rich, complicated portrait of a man who was only nineteen when he changed the face of rock 'n' roll. This is the definitive story of a musical icon. -- From book jacket.

13 15 19 22 27 60 89 92 103 115 119 124 130 132 135 138 141 151 164

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Publishers Weekly Review

The mystique surrounding 65-year-old Robert Plant-a man who reimagined the role of rock star while in Led Zeppelin-makes it nearly impossible to write the singer's first comprehensive biography, and an unauthorized one at that. British veteran music journalist Rees attempts to find a balance between the man, the myth, the music, and the darkness, but he ultimately delivers a piece of general reportage with intermittent moments of drama and clarity. The one-time editor of Kerrang! and Q magazines gleaned details from other books and articles, as well as his own previous conversations with Plant and many of Plant's former classmates, band mates, and tour mates-some who weren't afraid to speak candidly and critically. Even as a mischievous English grammar-school student, Plant had the talent and looks that eventually propelled him to self-described "golden god" status. He sang in regional bands before guitarist Jimmy Page recruited him for a new group that became Led Zeppelin. Groupies, drugs, and tragedy followed as Zeppelin's legend grew. The band dissolved after drummer John Bonham's death in 1980, and Plant reemerged as an ever-evolving solo artist who kept his distance from Zeppelin, rarely reuniting with his former band mates. This book is billed as the singer's definitive story, but that will remain untold until Plant writes it himself. Agent: Matthew Hamilton, Aitkin Alexander Associates. (Oct.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Kirkus Book Review

By-the-numbers biography of the shaggy rocker. Unfortunately, former Q and Kerrang! editor Rees hits nearly every rock-bio clich. As his yarn opens, we find an aging Plant, frontman of Led Zeppelin, world-weary, "the weight of history pressing down upon him; the burden of all the demons he had come here to put to rest at last." Then the perfunctory career review begins: Midlands boy grows up in a bombed-out, gritty industrial landscape, the child of music-loving (but classical music, mind you) parents, hears Elvis--and, more to the point, Bill Haley and His Comets--and is turned into a faux American. As Rees rightly notes, Plant, initially known in Britain as the hippie's hippie, is a shrewd and bookish fellow who refuses to be pinned down. He made his fortune as a singer of heavy rock, but, as folk-rock idol Roy Harper says, "Robust Planet" was smart not to do the same old rock thing in the 30-odd years post-Zep, instead searching endlessly on the musical horizon for the next thing to do. (The current next thing is a blend of Middle Eastern and Americana, a pleasingly contradictory sound.) Plant, who at 65 "is now eligible for a bus pass and a state pension" in Britain, is a serious enough musician to warrant a serious biography, though perhaps it's payback for thudding anthems like "Kashmir" and "Immigrant Song" to have a life story clotted with thudding prose along the lines of "His path was set," "In many respects 1965 was to be a pivotal year," and "He heard the screams, smelt the sex and sensed the power that could be bestowed upon the man with the microphone." For die-hard fans only. Zeppelin fanatics will want to turn to Stephen Davis' hoary Hammer of the Gods (1985), which, though covering only the band and not Plant's solo decades, isn't as painful to read.]] Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.