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World War II battlefield communications / Gordon L. Rottman ; illustrated by Peter Dennis ; consultant editor Martin Windrow.

By: Rottman, Gordon L.
Contributor(s): Dennis, Peter, 1950-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Elite series: 181.Publisher: Oxford : Osprey, 2010Description: 64 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 25 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781846038471 (pbk.); 1846038472 (pbk.); 9781849082853 (ebook); 1849082855 (e-book).Subject(s): World War, 1939-1945 -- Communications | World War, 1939-1945 -- Equipment and suppliesDDC classification: 358.24809044
Contents:
Means of Tactical Communications -- Field telephones -- Radios -- Visual signals: flare and smoke projectiles - smoke grenades and candles - signal flags - marker panels - signal lights - arm and hand signals -- Messengers -- Audible signals -- Unit Communications Equipment -- United States -- Britain and Empire/Commonwealth -- Soviet Union -- Germany -- Japan -- Communications Procedures -- Phonetic alphabets -- Morse code -- Times and dates -- Documents: security classifications -message precedence -- Message center operations -- Communications countermeasures -- Signal Units -- Divisional units -- Infantry regimental and battalion signal elements: United States - Britain and Commonwealth - Soviet Union - Germany - Japan -- Unit Communication Systems.
Review: "The development of practical, man-portable radio sets for communication between companies and battalion headquarters, and later between platoons and companies, was central to the character of World War II infantry fighting. It enabled units to employ flexible, coordinated tactics, allowing their commanders to exploit success, call in supporting fire, or limit the costs of failure. However, the new man-pack radios were still immature and infantry commanders also had to employ other means, from wire-linked field telephones to the most basic of all - a soldier carrying a message. This concise guide to a vital and fascinating aspect of World War II tactics explains the equipment and practice of the US, British, Soviet, German, and Japanese armies. It is illustrated with many wartime photos, and with color plates showing everything from telephones and radios to flags and flare pistols, and how they were used."--BOOK JACKET.
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Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Non-Fiction
Non-Fiction 358.248 ROT 1 Available

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Osprey's examination of technological advances in communications during World War II (1939-1945). Perhaps the biggest difference in the fighting between the two World Wars lay in the invention of the man-portable radio that allowed for a greater degree of tactical coordination than ever before. Gordon L. Rottman provides an informative study of the use of small radios, field telephones, signal flares and ground-to-air signaling that revolutionized the battlefield.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Means of Tactical Communications -- Field telephones -- Radios -- Visual signals: flare and smoke projectiles - smoke grenades and candles - signal flags - marker panels - signal lights - arm and hand signals -- Messengers -- Audible signals -- Unit Communications Equipment -- United States -- Britain and Empire/Commonwealth -- Soviet Union -- Germany -- Japan -- Communications Procedures -- Phonetic alphabets -- Morse code -- Times and dates -- Documents: security classifications -message precedence -- Message center operations -- Communications countermeasures -- Signal Units -- Divisional units -- Infantry regimental and battalion signal elements: United States - Britain and Commonwealth - Soviet Union - Germany - Japan -- Unit Communication Systems.

"The development of practical, man-portable radio sets for communication between companies and battalion headquarters, and later between platoons and companies, was central to the character of World War II infantry fighting. It enabled units to employ flexible, coordinated tactics, allowing their commanders to exploit success, call in supporting fire, or limit the costs of failure. However, the new man-pack radios were still immature and infantry commanders also had to employ other means, from wire-linked field telephones to the most basic of all - a soldier carrying a message. This concise guide to a vital and fascinating aspect of World War II tactics explains the equipment and practice of the US, British, Soviet, German, and Japanese armies. It is illustrated with many wartime photos, and with color plates showing everything from telephones and radios to flags and flare pistols, and how they were used."--BOOK JACKET.

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Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Introduction (p. 4)
  • Means of Tactical Communications (p. 6)
  • Field telephones
  • Radios
  • Visual signals: flare and smoke projectiles
  • smoke grenades and candles
  • signal flags
  • marker panels
  • signal lights
  • arm and hand signals
  • Messengers
  • Audible signals
  • Unit Communications Equipment (p. 20)
  • United States
  • Britain and Empire/Commonwealth
  • Soviet Union
  • Germany
  • Japan
  • Communications Procedures (p. 38)
  • Phonetic alphabets
  • Morse code
  • Times and dates
  • Documents: security classifications
  • message precedence
  • Message center operations
  • Communications countermeasures
  • Signal Units (p. 50)
  • Divisional units
  • Infantry regimental and battalion signal elements: United States
  • Britain and Commonwealth
  • Soviet Union
  • Germany
  • Japan
  • Unit Communication Systems (p. 57)
  • Conclusion (p. 61)
  • Select Bibliography (p. 62)
  • Index (p. 64)