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Bald is better with earrings : a survivor's guide to getting through breast cancer / Andrea Hutton.

By: Hutton, Andrea [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York, NY : Harper Wave, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers, [2015]Copyright date: ©2015Edition: First edition.Description: xiv, 205 pages ; 21 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780062375650; 0062375652.Subject(s): Breast -- Cancer | Breast -- Cancer -- Popular works | Breast -- Cancer -- Patients -- Rehabilitation | Breast -- Cancer -- Psychological aspects | Breast -- Cancer -- Social aspectsDDC classification: 616.99/449
Contents:
My story. The lumps ; Top 5 tips for when you are diagnosed -- Tests. MRI ; Top 5 tips for your first MRI ; PET scan ; Top 5 tips for PET/CT scans ; Bone scan ; Top 5 tips for a bone scan -- Results. Telling your family and friends ; Sharing the news ; Choosing a surgeon ; Top 5 tips for choosing a surgeon -- Surgery. One lump or two? and other agonizing choices ; Reconstruction ; Top 5 tips for choosing your surgery ; Before ; During ; The drain ; After ; Getting dressed ; Postsurgical follow-up ; Top 5 tips for before and after a mastectomy ; Bra shopping ; Lymph nodes and your arm ; Top 5 tips for preventing lymphedema ; The port ; Accessing the port/lab work ; Port whines ; Top 5 tips for dealing with a port -- Chemotherapy. Day one ; What to bring ; Top 5 tips during chemo ; The chemo room ; Top 5 tips after chemo ; The side effects ; Top 5 tips for handling chemo ; Complications-- and more side effects ; Hot flashes ; Top 5 tips for dealing with side effects ; Steroids ; Top tip for steroid side effects ; Drug allergies and adverse reactions ; Top 5 tips for understanding your treatments -- Bald is better with earrings.To shave or not to shave ; Hair today, gone tomorrow ; Top 5 tips for when you are going bald ; Getting wiggy and the art of scarf typing ; Top 5 tips for wig wearers ; Growing back ; Top 5 tips when your hair starts growing back ; Scarves and hats ; Top 5 tips for wearing scarves and hats ; More hair ; Top 5 tips for the growing-out stage -- Radiation. Planning and plotting ; Top 5 tips for the first radiation appointment ; Preheat ; Bake ; The afterburn ; Top 5 tips for protecting your skin during radiation -- How "normal" is the new normal? Top 5 tips for dealing with people ; Dealing with your self-image ; Top 5 tips for dealing with your self-image ; Dealing with others' images of you -- Sex, drugs, and no more rock and roll. Top 5 tips for handling all the medications ; Sex ; Top 5 tips for sex and the new you ; Partners and caregivers ; Top 5 tips for helping your caregiver ; No more rock and roll ; Top 1 tip for dealing with cancer girl -- The end of treatment. Chemo brain ; Continuing treatments ; scar tissue ; Why doesn't he call? ; Looking forward ; October ; Fear of dying ; Top 5 tips for getting on with your life.
Summary: The breast cancer guide every woman needs for herself, her best friend, and her sister--a warm, practical, relatable handbook, that dispels the terror, taking you step-by-step through the process, from diagnosis to post-treatment. When Andrea Hutton was diagnosed with breast cancer, she wanted to know everything. She voraciously read books, articles, and websites and talked to everyone she knew. But nothing prepared her for what the surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation would feel like. Were there tricks that could ease her pain and discomfort? What was "fatigue" and how would it affect her? At what exact moment would her hair fall out and how? Hutton wanted what she could not find: a clear how-to guide for the cancer girl she had become.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due
Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Non-Fiction
Non-Fiction 616.994 HUT 1 Available

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

The breast cancer guide every woman needs for herself, her best friend, and her sister--a warm, practical, relatable handbook, that dispels the terror, taking you step-by-step through the process, from diagnosis to post-treatment.

When Andrea Hutton was diagnosed with breast cancer, she wanted to know everything. She voraciously read books, articles, and websites and talked to everyone she knew. But nothing prepared her for what the surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation would feel like. Were there tricks that could ease her pain and discomfort? What was "fatigue" and how would it affect her? At what exact moment would her hair fall out and how? Hutton wanted what she could not find: a clear how-to guide for the cancer girl she had become.

Bald Is Better with Earrings is Hutton's answer for women diagnosed with breast cancer: a straightforward handbook, leavened with humor and inspiration, to shepherd them though the experience. Warm and down-to-earth, Hutton explains what to expect and walks you through this intense and emotional process: tests, surgery, chemo, losing your hair and shaving your head, being bald, radiation treatments.

Hutton offers a wealth of invaluable advice--from tricks for surviving chemo, to treating your skin during radiation, to keeping track of meds--and includes a practical list of tips for each stage of the process at the end of every chapter. Compassionate, friendly, and shaped by Hutton's first-hand knowledge, Bald Is Better with Earrings is the comprehensive, essential companion for anyone dealing with breast cancer.

My story. The lumps ; Top 5 tips for when you are diagnosed -- Tests. MRI ; Top 5 tips for your first MRI ; PET scan ; Top 5 tips for PET/CT scans ; Bone scan ; Top 5 tips for a bone scan -- Results. Telling your family and friends ; Sharing the news ; Choosing a surgeon ; Top 5 tips for choosing a surgeon -- Surgery. One lump or two? and other agonizing choices ; Reconstruction ; Top 5 tips for choosing your surgery ; Before ; During ; The drain ; After ; Getting dressed ; Postsurgical follow-up ; Top 5 tips for before and after a mastectomy ; Bra shopping ; Lymph nodes and your arm ; Top 5 tips for preventing lymphedema ; The port ; Accessing the port/lab work ; Port whines ; Top 5 tips for dealing with a port -- Chemotherapy. Day one ; What to bring ; Top 5 tips during chemo ; The chemo room ; Top 5 tips after chemo ; The side effects ; Top 5 tips for handling chemo ; Complications-- and more side effects ; Hot flashes ; Top 5 tips for dealing with side effects ; Steroids ; Top tip for steroid side effects ; Drug allergies and adverse reactions ; Top 5 tips for understanding your treatments -- Bald is better with earrings.To shave or not to shave ; Hair today, gone tomorrow ; Top 5 tips for when you are going bald ; Getting wiggy and the art of scarf typing ; Top 5 tips for wig wearers ; Growing back ; Top 5 tips when your hair starts growing back ; Scarves and hats ; Top 5 tips for wearing scarves and hats ; More hair ; Top 5 tips for the growing-out stage -- Radiation. Planning and plotting ; Top 5 tips for the first radiation appointment ; Preheat ; Bake ; The afterburn ; Top 5 tips for protecting your skin during radiation -- How "normal" is the new normal? Top 5 tips for dealing with people ; Dealing with your self-image ; Top 5 tips for dealing with your self-image ; Dealing with others' images of you -- Sex, drugs, and no more rock and roll. Top 5 tips for handling all the medications ; Sex ; Top 5 tips for sex and the new you ; Partners and caregivers ; Top 5 tips for helping your caregiver ; No more rock and roll ; Top 1 tip for dealing with cancer girl -- The end of treatment. Chemo brain ; Continuing treatments ; scar tissue ; Why doesn't he call? ; Looking forward ; October ; Fear of dying ; Top 5 tips for getting on with your life.

The breast cancer guide every woman needs for herself, her best friend, and her sister--a warm, practical, relatable handbook, that dispels the terror, taking you step-by-step through the process, from diagnosis to post-treatment. When Andrea Hutton was diagnosed with breast cancer, she wanted to know everything. She voraciously read books, articles, and websites and talked to everyone she knew. But nothing prepared her for what the surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation would feel like. Were there tricks that could ease her pain and discomfort? What was "fatigue" and how would it affect her? At what exact moment would her hair fall out and how? Hutton wanted what she could not find: a clear how-to guide for the cancer girl she had become.

7 11 18 19 20 27 68 76 96 135 142 151 168 172

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Introduction (p. xi)
  • 1 My Story (p. 1)
  • The Lumps
  • Top 5 Tips for When You Are Diagnosed
  • 2 Tests (p. 8)
  • MRI
  • Top 5 Tips for Your First MRI
  • Pet Scan
  • Top 5 Tips for Pet/Ct Scans
  • Bone Scan
  • Top 5 Tips for a Bone Scan
  • 3 Results (p. 21)
  • Telling Your Family and Friends
  • Sharing the News
  • Choosing a Surgeon
  • Top 5 Tips for Choosing a Surgeon
  • 4 Surgery (p. 34)
  • One Lump or Two? and Other Agonizing Choices
  • Reconstruction
  • Top 5 Tips for Choosing Your Surgery
  • Before
  • During
  • The Drain
  • After
  • Getting Dressed
  • Postsurgical Follow-Up
  • Top 5 Tips for Before and After a Mastectomy
  • Bra Shopping
  • Lymph Nodes and Your Arm
  • Top 5 Tips for Preventing Lymphedema
  • The Port
  • Accessing the Port/Lab Work
  • Port Whines - Top 5 Tips for Dealing with a Port
  • 5 Chemotherapy (p. 73)
  • Day One
  • What to Bring
  • Top 5 Tips During Chemo
  • The Chemo Room
  • Top 5 Tips After Chemo
  • The Side Effects
  • Top 5 Tips for Handling Chemo
  • Complications-And More Side Effects
  • Hot Flashes
  • Top 5 Tips for Dealing with Side Effects
  • Steroids
  • Top Tip for Steroid Side Effects
  • Drug Allergies and Adverse Reactions
  • Top 5 Tips for Understanding Your Treatments
  • 6 Bald Is Better With Earrings (p. 114)
  • To Shave or Not to Shave
  • Hair Today, Gone Tomorrow
  • Top 5 Tips for When You Are Going Bald
  • Getting Wiggy and the Art of Scarf Tying
  • Top J Tips for Wig Wearers
  • Growing Back
  • Top 5 Tips When Your Hair Starts Growing Back
  • Scarves and Hats
  • Top 5 Tips for Wearing Scarves and Hats
  • More Hair
  • Top 5 Tips for the Growing-Out Stage
  • 7 Radiation (p. 143)
  • Planning and Plotting
  • Top 5 Tips for the First Radiation Appointment
  • Preheat
  • Bake
  • The Afterburn
  • Top 5 Tips for Protecting Your Skin During Radiation
  • 8 How "Normal" Is the New Normal? (p. 157)
  • Top 5 Tips for Dealing with People
  • Dealing with Your Self-Image
  • Top 5 Tips for Dealing with Your Self-Image
  • Dealing with Others' Images of You
  • 9 Sex, Drugs, and No More Rock and Roll (p. 171)
  • Top 5 Tips for Handling All the Medications
  • Sex
  • Top 5 Tips For Sex and the New You
  • Partners and Caregivers
  • Top 5 Tips for Helping Your Caregiver
  • No More Rock and Roll
  • Top I Tip for Dealing with Cancer Girl
  • 10 The End of Treatment (p. 183)
  • Chemo Brain
  • Continuing Treatments
  • Scar Tissue
  • Why Doesn't He Call?
  • Looking Forward
  • October
  • Fear of Dying
  • Top 5 Tips for Getting on with Your Life
  • Acknowledgments (p. 205)

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Interior designer Hutton was 41 in 2009 when she became a member of the CSC, Cancer Sucks Club. She went through a year's worth of tests, diagnosis, surgery, and treatment and, in what began as a blog to keep friends and family updated, here lays it all out, in meticulous detail, for those enduring the same experience. Going for a humorous tone, the author describes her cancer journey and supplements it with list upon list of top tips to consider, plus sidebars on everything from fitting a bra to finding just the right scarf. Other titles have sought to personalize the cancer life for the newly diagnosed (e.g., Teresa J. Rhyne's The Dog Lived (and So Will I) and Melanie Young's Getting Things off My Chest), but Hutton digs down to the nittiest and the grittiest, for example, allergic reactions to chemo drugs and the minutiae of port maintenance. VERDICT Readers will be equally overwhelmed and overjoyed by Hutton's prescriptions. This book could be a lifesaver for breast cancer club members.-Bette-Lee Fox, Library Journal © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Publishers Weekly Review

Breast cancer survivor Hutton offers a wealth of insider knowledge on exactly what to expect of the "emotional and physical roller coaster" involved in battling the disease. Hutton offers both serious and lighthearted suggestions for getting through early testing, advising readers to "never go to a mammogram alone" and rating the flavors of pre-PET/CT scan barium milk ("mocha is the best"). She provides tips for choosing the appropriate surgery and information on breast prostheses, noting wryly that the proprietors of stores selling these tend to be well-endowed women, evidence of a possible "conspiracy." A chapter on chemotherapy covers preliminaries, aftercare, and side effects before delving into the big conundrum: "how and when to shave your head." Hutton explains basic care for synthetic and real-hair wigs and compassionately addresses potential feelings of a loss of femininity. She illuminates some less-discussed treatment side effects like "steroid rage," fingernail breakage, loss of eyelashes, and radiation fatigue. On the interpersonal level, Hutton discusses best practices for telling your family your diagnosis and categorizes different reactions loved ones tend to have, while giving permission to "lash out appropriately." Finally, Hutton reflects on the ongoing stress of continued screening, noting, "Once you've crossed the street, you're stuck on this side forever." While there is no universal cancer experience, Hutton covers the most likely scenarios in detailed fashion with grace, empathy, and humor. (July) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Booklist Review

How-to-survive breast-cancer handbooks are proliferating as many women (and a few men) are tested, retested, diagnosed, and submitted to cancer surgery, which can sometimes mean losing one or both breasts. Follow-ups can vary from nothing to aggressive courses of chemotherapy and radiation, and survivors' guidebooks like Hutton's frequently claim to dissipate terror and prepare the newly diagnosed for what will follow. But nothing can. Still, Hutton's transformation into Cancer Girl motivated her to start a blog, then, recognizing that her intense research didn't prepare her for her cancer journey, expand it into this straightforward, often humorous, no-nonsense, step-by-step, tip-filled text. No single guide can be all-inclusive since cancer cases vary widely, but Hutton's Top Tips for choosing a surgeon, understanding and handling radiation and chemo, dealing with your new self-image and scars, approaching postsurgery sex, managing side effects from treatments and accompanying medications, and getting on with your life will help many.--Scott, Whitney Copyright 2015 Booklist