Whanganuilibrary.com
Normal view MARC view ISBD view

The truth : an uncomfortable book about relationships / Neil Strauss.

By: Strauss, Neil [author.].
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Dey St., an imprint of William Morrow Publishers, [2015]Copyright date: ©2015Edition: First edition.Description: 421 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780060898762; 0060898763.Subject(s): Strauss, Neil -- Relations with women | Commitment (Psychology) | Interpersonal relations | Couples | Dating (Social customs)
Contents:
Prologue: The Hand You Are Dealt Face Down -- Infidelity -- Exclusivity -- Alternatives -- Anhedonia -- Freedom -- Epilogue: When the Wild Card Is Played, Is It Still Wild?.
Summary: The book jump-started the international seduction community, and made Strauss a household name--revered or notorious--among single men and women alike. But the experience of writing The Game also transformed Strauss into a man who could have what every man wants: the ability to date--and/or have casual sex with--almost every woman he met.
Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Non-Fiction
Non-Fiction 306.7 STR 1 Available T00590919
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

<p>In The Truth, Neil Strauss takes on his greatest challenge yet: Relationships. And in this wild and highly entertaining ride, he explores the questions that men and women are asking themselves every day:<br> <br></p> Is it natural to be faithful to one person for life? Do alternatives to monogamy lead to better relationships and greater happiness? What draws us to the partners we choose? Can we keep passion and romance from fading over time? <p>His quest for answers takes him from Viagra-laden free-love orgies to sex addiction clinics, from cutting-edge science labs to modern-day harems, and, most terrifying of all, to his own mother.</p> <p>What he discovered changed everything he knew about love, sex, relationships, and, ultimately, himself.</p> <p>Searingly honest and compulsively readable, The Truth just may have the same effect on you.</p> <p>If The Game taught you how to meet members of the opposite sex, The Truth will teach you how to keep them.</p>

Prologue: The Hand You Are Dealt Face Down -- Infidelity -- Exclusivity -- Alternatives -- Anhedonia -- Freedom -- Epilogue: When the Wild Card Is Played, Is It Still Wild?.

The book jump-started the international seduction community, and made Strauss a household name--revered or notorious--among single men and women alike. But the experience of writing The Game also transformed Strauss into a man who could have what every man wants: the ability to date--and/or have casual sex with--almost every woman he met.

2 11 93 115

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Booklist Review

The author of the notorious tell-all The Game (2005) checking into sex-addiction rehab? Strauss, a writer for Rolling Stone who not only wrote about, as the subtitle of The Game puts it, penetrating the secret society of pickup artists, but who also became a pickup artist himself, turns out to be unhappy that he cheated on his girlfriend and is seeking to find a way to be true to himself. The result is The Truth, a brutally honest and emotionally exhaustive account of his search for sexual freedom. Strauss skewers many of those he meets on his journey, from his hapless fellow sex addicts and their domineering group leader to the New Age polyamorists who have a marked preoccupation with extraterrestrials. But he reserves his most searing insights for himself. Yes, there are orgies and swinger parties, but there are also far more intense discussions about the meaning of intimacy and the underlying causes of sexual behavior. Strauss struggles to learn a hard lesson that there are rules in any relationship, and to play the only game that matters, you need to find rules that both partners can follow.--Thoreson, Bridget Copyright 2015 Booklist

Kirkus Book Review

Rolling Stone scribe and infamous Lothario Strauss (Everyone Loves You When You're Dead: Journeys into Fame and Madness, 2011, etc.) chronicles a lascivious seesaw battle between monogamy and debauchery. For years, sex, drugs, and rock 'n' roll seemed to be the author's mantra, even his very reason for being. The Game, Strauss' notorious 2005 book about the art of seducing beautiful women, helped to catapult the journalist to the heights of literary fortune and fame. But after traveling the globe partying with rock stars and fashionistas in a nonstop thrill ride of overindulgence, Strauss met Ingrid, a woman so wonderful in his eyes that he determined to bury his libertine ways forever and dedicate himself to her exclusively. Of course, he immediately screwed up, reverted to his hound-dog ways and discovered that the only possible way of salvaging Ingrid's affections was to check into a high-priced rehab clinic for sex addicts. Strauss' dark humor and intelligence illuminate his (seemingly useless) initial efforts to get with the program, and the encounters with tightly wound psychologists and hapless addicts like himself are both entertaining and thought-provoking. Unable, or unwilling, to accept monogamy, Strauss again reversed course, ditched therapy, and rededicated himself to the pursuit of a polyamorous lifestyle. What follows is an oddly tedious odyssey of orgiastic excess that appears doomed to everyone except Strauss himself. Still, the edgy author's relentless introspection and willingness to openly navigate the landscape of his sex-soaked psyche are compelling, if often frustrating for readers. "It's a lot to take in and I struggle to understand it all. Then I decide I don't need to understand it," he writes. "I just need to do it." Music impresario Rick Rubin serves as Strauss' guiding light, intermittently popping in and out with sage advice. Some readers may have no sympathy for the author, but he delivers an emotionally charged, provocative memoir of a man learning to confront his sexual demons. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.