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Learn to draw forest animals : step-by-step instructions for more than 25 woodland creatures / illustrated by Robbin Cuddy.

By: Cuddy, Robbin [illustrator.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: Learn to draw series (Laguna Hills, Calif.): Publisher: Lake Forest, CA Walter Foster Jr., [2015]Copyright date: ©2015Description: 64 pages : colour illustrations ; 28 cm.Content type: text | still image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781600584824; 1600584829.Other title: Forest animals.Subject(s): Drawing -- Technique -- Juvenile literature | Forest animals in art -- Juvenile literature | Wildlife art -- Juvenile literatureGenre/Form: Children's nonfiction. DDC classification: 743.6
Contents:
Tools & Materials -- How to Use This Book -- Vocabulary -- Bald Eagle -- Barn Owl -- Bighorn Sheep -- Bison -- Bobcat -- Chipmunk -- Coyote -- Cutthroat Trout -- Fawn -- Forest Elephant -- Gray Squirrel -- Grizzly Bear -- Hedgehog -- Mountain Lion -- Mute Swan -- Orangutan -- Pileated Woodpecker -- Stag -- Turkey -- Gray Wolf -- Beaver -- Moose -- Pine Marten -- Prairie Rattlesnake -- Raccoon -- Rocky Mountain Goat -- Red Fox -- Giant Panda.
Summary: The book opens with brief information for getting started, the tools and materials needed, and some sample drawing exercises to warm up. Each drawing lesson begins with a basic shape, such as a square, a circle, or a triangle, and progresses to a finished colored piece of artwork, making it easy for children to follow along. Along the way, engaging text describes interesting facts about each animal.
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Fiction notes: Click to open in new window
Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Childrens Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Children's Non-fiction
Children's Non-fiction 743.6 CUD 1 Available T00584314
Childrens Non-Fiction Davis (Central) Library
Children's Non-fiction
Children's Non-fiction 743.6 CUD 3 Available T00584385
Childrens Non-Fiction Rangiora Street Library
Children's Non-fiction
Children's Non-fiction 743.6 CUD 2 Available T00584380
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

With a mix of art instruction and engaging information, Learn to Draw Forest Animals is the perfect way for children to discover more about their favorite animals, in addition to expressing their artistic side.<br> <br>

"Contains fun facts, quizzes, color photos, and much more!"--Cover.

Tools & Materials -- How to Use This Book -- Vocabulary -- Bald Eagle -- Barn Owl -- Bighorn Sheep -- Bison -- Bobcat -- Chipmunk -- Coyote -- Cutthroat Trout -- Fawn -- Forest Elephant -- Gray Squirrel -- Grizzly Bear -- Hedgehog -- Mountain Lion -- Mute Swan -- Orangutan -- Pileated Woodpecker -- Stag -- Turkey -- Gray Wolf -- Beaver -- Moose -- Pine Marten -- Prairie Rattlesnake -- Raccoon -- Rocky Mountain Goat -- Red Fox -- Giant Panda.

The book opens with brief information for getting started, the tools and materials needed, and some sample drawing exercises to warm up. Each drawing lesson begins with a basic shape, such as a square, a circle, or a triangle, and progresses to a finished colored piece of artwork, making it easy for children to follow along. Along the way, engaging text describes interesting facts about each animal.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-4-These books provide step-by-step instructions for depicting a wide variety of animals. Forest Animals covers a diverse selection of creatures, such as raccoons, barn owls, orangutans, and forest elephants, while Cats & Kittens has directions for drawing various breeds, such as Manx, Persian, Siamese, and Maine Coon. Each animal is featured on a colorful, cleanly designed spread that includes a photo, a few basic facts about the species (or breed), and occasional mini-quizzes. While the steps usually begin with a few basic shapes, such as a couple of circles for the head and body, they quickly jump from a fairly simple collection of lines and shapes to a completed animal with lots of shading and detail, without offering much guidance on how to make the transition. There are no tips on, for instance, how to illustrate fur or how to use lighter lines that can be erased later on. While other series, like Lee Ames's "Draw 50" books (Watson-Guptill), do a better job of breaking down the examples into manageable steps, with suggestions on how to improve skills, these titles are acceptable additions. VERDICT The eye-catching covers are bound to attract kids, and those who already love to draw will likely enjoy the challenge of re-creating the steps.-Ashley Larsen, Pacifica Libraries, CA © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.